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COLLECTION Identifier: Gr-11

Clara Goldberg Schiffer print collection documenting working women, 1861-2000 (inclusive), 1861-1897 (bulk)

Overview

19th century prints of women's work in the United States and abroad.

Dates

  • 1861-2000
  • Majority of material found within 1861-1897

Language of Materials

Materials in English.

TERMS OF USE

Access. Unrestricted.

Conditions Governing Use

Copyright. Harvard University makes no representation that it is the owner of the copyright in any part of this collection; permission to publish must be obtained from the owner(s) of the copyright (the author or her/his transferees, heirs, legatees, or literary executors).

Copying. Papers may be copied in accordance with the library's usual procedures.

Extent

1.58 linear feet (1 folio+ box, 1 half file box)
The collection consists primarily of electrotype and photomechanical prints, largely from the 19th century pictorial press, photographs, clippings, and pamphlets illustrating women's work in the United States and abroad. Women are depicted in the traditional occupations open to them: agriculture, factories, laundry, needlework, and school teaching. Additionally they are shown selling at United States Sanitary Commission fairs, cooking, nursing, studying design, and taking dictation on Edison's phonograph. A few fine art prints are also included.

The collection is arranged in three series:

Series I, Prints of United States Subjects (#1F+B.1-1F+B.9), consists of illustrations of women's employment from Harper's Weekly, Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, The Courier Journal, The Saturday Evening Post, Appleton's Journal of Medicine, Christian Herald and Signs of Our Times, Our Daily Fare, and The Inland Printer. A few fine art woodcuts are also included.

Series II, Prints of Non-United States Subjects (#1F+B.10), consists of scenes of women workers in France and Great Britain.

Series III, Other formats (#2.1-2.3), consists of pamphlets and photographs of women suffragists, a woman aircraft worker during World War II, and a telephone operator.

These prints are addenda to a larger collection (Gr-10) Schiffer gave to the Schlesinger Library between 1988 and 1997.

BIOGRAPHY

Clara Goldberg Schiffer (A.B. Radcliffe College, 1932 and M.A. George Washington University, 1939), health program analyst for the United States Department of Heath and Human Services, developed an interest in the history of women and work, and over the years compiled a large collection of images of women's work culled from the 19th century pictorial press.

ARRANGEMENT

The collection is arranged in three series:
  1. Series I. Prints of United States Subjects (#1F+B.1-1F+B.9)
  2. Series II. Prints of Non-United States Subjects (#1F+B.10)
  3. Series III. Other formats (#2.1-2.3)

Physical Location

Collection stored off site: researchers must request access 36 hours before use.

Immediate Source of Acquisition

Accession numbers: 98-M185, 2000-M108, 2002-M17, 2003-M47, 2003-M138, 2004-M100, 2019-M22

These prints were given to the Schlesinger Library by Clara Goldberg Schiffer between October 1998 and August 2004, and by Lois Schiffer in February 2019.

Related Material:

There is related material at the Schlesinger Library; see Clara Goldberg Schiffer print collection documenting working women, 1839-1994 (Gr-10.).

Processing Information

Processed: November 2002

By: Jane S. Knowles

Updated and additional materials added: September 2019

By: Jenny Gotwals
Link to catalog
Title
Schiffer, Clara Goldberg, collector. Clara Goldberg Schiffer print collection documenting working women, 1861-2000 (inclusive), 1861-1897 (bulk): A Finding Aid
Author
Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America
EAD ID
sch00212

Repository Details

Part of the Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute Repository

The preeminent research library on the history of women in the United States, the Schlesinger Library documents women's lives from the past and present for the future.

Contact:
3 James St.
Cambridge MA 02138 USA
(617) 495-8647