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COLLECTION Identifier: MC 332; M-88

Papers of Leon Malmed and Emma Goldman, 1899-1982 (inclusive), 1899-1940 (bulk)

Letters from Emma Goldman to Leon Malmed, photographs of Goldman, Malmed, and Alexander Berkman, printed ephemera, and writings by Goldman and others.

Dates

  • 1899-1982
  • Majority of material found within 1899-1940

Language of Materials

Materials in English.

Access Restrictions:

Access. Originals are closed; use microfilm M-88 or digital images.

Conditions Governing Use

Copyright. Copyright is held by the President and Fellows of Harvard College for the Schlesinger Library.

Copying. Papers may be copied in accordance with the library's usual procedures.

Extent

1.88 linear feet (4 + 1/2 file boxes)

The collection consists almost entirely of correspondence, with small numbers of photographs of Emma Goldman, Leon Malmed, and Alexander Berkman, printed ephemera, and writings by Goldman and others. The correspondence consists mainly of more than 450 letters, postcards and telegrams from Goldman to Malmed, 1906-1939; in many of the later ones Goldman enclosed carbon copies of her letters to others or carbon copies of transcripts of letters from others to her. Other major writers to Malmed include Alexander Berkman, Stella Comyn, and Warren Starr Van Valkenburgh (who always signed himself W.S. and used the pen name Walter Starrett). The collection also contains letters from Goldman and Berkman to Nunia Seldes, and three letters (one a fragment) from Goldman to Ben Reitman. It is not known how these came to be in Malmed's possession. There are also letters to Malmed from friends in the anarchist movement; of particular interest are the accounts of Osias Leibovitz of life in Monroe, Louisiana, in 1902 (see #1). The whereabouts of Leon Malmed's letters to Goldman are not known and there are only three letters written by him in this collection: one (a fragment) to his family (1915, see #16), another to Stella Comyn (1921, see #27), and a third to Goldman (1929, see #56); the last was perhaps never sent.

An index of correspondents follows the inventory. Enclosures and other papers that are not letters are not indexed, but are described in the inventory.

Goldman was aware of the importance of this collection and referred to it several times in her letters to Malmed and W.S. Van Valkenburgh (see #31, 32, 49, 66). The papers provide information about Goldman, her family, her life and involvement in the anarchist movement, her lecture tours in the United States and other countries, her experience in the Soviet Union, her books, her friends and colleagues, her loneliness and frustration after being deported, her attitude toward love, friendship, and marriage, the atmosphere in Europe before World War II, and the Spanish Civil War. There is some information about Malmed, his family and his business ventures, as well as Goldman's opinions about success in the business world.

All the correspondence (#1-74) is arranged chronologically, with undated letters at the end. Miscellaneous material, including printed ephemera and writings by others, are in #75-77, and photographs are in #78-79.

This collection was handled by members of the Malmed family, and perhaps by others, before being acquired by the Schlesinger Library. When a letter mentions enclosures that were not found with it, the processor has appended a note to that effect. Letters found together with a cover letter in one envelope have been marked as enclosures. Some carbon copies of Goldman's letters to others and transcripts of letters by others to Goldman were separate, having no covering letters. These were placed in their proper chronological sequence; some refer to enclosures, but this was not noted by the processor. The collection contains duplicate and near duplicate copies of some of these transcripts. Only the near duplicates were microfilmed.

A number of letters from Goldman to Nunia Seldes were undated; some had been dated (directly on the letter or on an attached note) by person/s unknown. These dates were accepted by the processor in determining the letters' place in the chronological arrangement. Dates established by the processor are in square brackets.

Goldman often continued a letter to Malmed on the following day. Only the date at the beginning of the letter is noted in the inventory; the pages are numbered consecutively.

The recipient of all letters, unless otherwise noted, is Leon Malmed (LM ).

The writer of all letters, unless otherwise noted, is Emma Goldman (EG).

The letters are autograph letters signed (ALS) unless otherwise noted.

The description of the contents is not necessarily exhaustive; routine, commonplace contents are not noted.

All carbon copies (cc) are of transcript originals.

Enc: is used to indicate an enclosure.

BIOGRAPHY

Emma Goldman, anarchist, writer, lecturer and agitator for free speech and radical causes, was born in Kovno, Russia (1869) and emigrated to the United States in 1885. She lived first in Rochester, New York, where she married, divorced and remarried Jacob Kershner. In 1889 she settled alone in New York City, where she met Johann Most, editor of Freiheit, and Alexander Berkman. She joined the anarchist movement and soon became a public speaker for the cause. While editor of Mother Earth, 1906-17, she published anarchist pamphlets and books, including her own Anarchism and Other Essays (1911). Goldman also lectured on the radical drama of Ibsen, Shaw and Strindberg and wrote The Social Significance of the Modern Drama (1914). In 1917 Goldman and Alexander Berkman were arrested for conspiracy to obstruct draft registration. They were found guilty and sentenced to prison (1918-1919). Three months after their release in 1919 they were deported to Russia. Goldman's sojourn in Russia (1920-1921), which led to the publication of My Disillusionment in Russia, (1923), was followed by short stays in Sweden, Germany, and England, where in 1925 she married James Colton to obtain British citizenship.

In 1926 Goldman traveled to Canada to lecture in English and Yiddish on drama and politics. In October her meeting with Leon Malmed, a long-time anarchist associate from Albany, New York, led to a passionate affair. After speaking at meetings across Canada she returned to France in 1928 to write her autobiography, Living My Life,(1931). Goldman returned to Canada in 1933 and in 1934 was given permission to enter the United States for a 90-day visit and lecture tour. Upon her return Europe Goldman became an active supporter of the Spanish Republican cause, visited Spain in 1936, 1937 and 1938, and attempted to raise money and arouse support in England. On a fund-raising visit to Canada in 1939, she suffered a stroke. She died in May 1940 and was buried in Chicago's Waldheim Cemetery near the graves of the "Haymarket martyrs."

For further biographical information, see the article in Notable American Women (Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1971), which includes a list of additional sources. See also To the Barricades: The Anarchist Life of Emma Goldman, by Alix Shulman (New York, 1971), which includes a selected biography. Other Goldman papers are listed in Women's History Sources, (New York, 1979). The material in this collection was not available for inclusion in any of the aforementioned publications.

The National Historical Publications and Records Commission and the Rockefeller Foundation have funded The Emma Goldman Papers Project of the Institute for the Study of Social Change, Berkeley, California, which proposes "...to microfilm all her correspondence and printed material except books available (Mother Earth, The Social Significance of the Modern Drama, and Anarchism and Other Essays)..." (Candace Falk, editor, letter to Patricia King, Director, Schlesinger Library, September 28, 1982.)

Leon Malmed, the collector of these papers and the friend and lover of Goldman, was born Leon Bass in Russia (1881) and emigrated to the United States in about 1895. His name, due to an error on the part of an immigration officer, was recorded Malmed or Malmet, the name of the half-brother who came to meet him. Leon Malmed went to work in New York City as a cigar maker. In 1904 he married Millie Mott (born ca.1882), a Russian emigrant who worked in a brush factory. Although not a radical herself, she attended meetings with a friend and there met Malmed. After their marriage the Malmeds moved to Albany, where Malmed continued to work as a cigarmaker until the factory was closed permanently by a strike. By 1907 Malmed had opened a delicatessen, which he ran with his wife. In the mid-twenties he was involved in real estate for a period of five or six years; during which time he closed the delicatessen and opened a hosiery store.

Leon Malmed was a radical and supported the anarchist movement, although his active participation seems to have decreased as his business demanded more time. Beginning in about 1903, he attended and arranged meetings and distributed literature. He met Goldman in about 1906; his friendship with her continued until her death. In 1915, after some travel on his own, he joined Goldman, Ben Reitman, and Alexander Berkman on a cross-country lecture tour, during which he was arrested and fined in Portland, Oregon, for distributing birth control material. In 1926 he contributed to a fund which made possible Goldman's trip to Canada, and in 1934 Malmed arranged her lectures in Albany. After Goldman's death he wrote, "I feel I lost the very essence of life in Emma's death" (see #69). Malmed died in 1956.

Immediate Source of Acquisition

Accession number: 81-M13

The Leon Malmed-Emma Goldman papers were purchased by the Schlesinger Library from Daniel Malmed, son of Leon Malmed, the recipient of most of the letters, in January 1981. The papers were acquired, processed and microfilmed with the support of the Alice R. Sigelman Philanthropic Fund of the Jewish Communal Fund and the Friends of the Schlesinger Library.

Existence and Location of Copies

The collection was microfilmed with the Fannie Dorothy Garfinkle Barrett Papers (A/B274), the Daniel Malmed Papers (A/M256), and the Lillian and William Mendelsohn Papers (A/M537). REQUEST AS M-88.

Related Material:

There is additional material available at the Schlesinger Library; see Emma Goldman Clippings, A/G620, Fannie Dorothy Garfinkle Barrett Papers, 1935-1937 (A/B274), the Daniel Malmed Papers, 1934-1981 (A/M256), and the Lillian and William Mendelsohn Papers, 1931-1982 (A/M537).
SEPARATION RECORD Accession number: 81-M13.

Processed by: Bert Hartry and Deborah Richards.

The following items have been transferred to the Schlesinger Library Vertical File:
SEPARATION RECORD
  1. The Control of Births. Reprint. Portland, Oregon: The Birth Control League, n.d.
  2. Opinions on Sex Education. New York: American Social Hygiene Association, 1915.
  3. Sanger, Margaret H. Family Limitation. n.p., n.d. [partial copy]
  4. "Sense About Sex." Lectures to Adult Australians By An Australian Woman Doctor. Sydney, N.S.W.: Free Speech League, n.d.
  5. Virility and Physical Development. Circular no. 5. San Francisco: California Social Hygiene Society, n.d.
  6. Why and How the Poor Should Not Have Many Children, n.d.
SEPARATION RECORD The following items have been transferred to the Schlesinger Library Book Collection:
SEPARATION RECORD
  1. Ames, Sarah E. An Open Letter to Judge Joseph E. Gary. Why the Undertone? Chicago: n.p., 1893.
  2. Bryant, Louise. Six Red Months in Russia. New York: Doran, 1918.
  3. De Cleyre, Voltairine. Crime and Punishment. Philadelphia: Social Science Club, 1903.
  4. De Cleyre, Voltairine. On Liberty. n.p., n.d.
  5. De Cleyre, Voltairine. Selected Works. Mother Earth Publishing Association, 1914.
  6. Goldman, Emma. Anarchism: What It Really Stands for. New York: Mother Earth Publishing Association, 1914.
  7. Goldman, Emma. My Disillusionment with Russia. Doubleday, 1923.
  8. Goldman, Emma. Social Significance of the Modern Drama. Boston: Richard G. Badger, 1914 [inscribed by Goldman]
  9. Goldman, Emma. Syndicalism. Mother Earth Publishing Association, 1913.
  10. Goldman, Emma. The Tragedy of Woman’s Emancipation. Mother Earth Publishing Association, n.d.
  11. Harlor. The Education of the Feminine Will. The Balzac Library, no. 61. New York: Tucker Pub. Co., 1900.
  12. Mother Earth Vol. 1-Vol. 10 (1906-1915)
  13. Mother Earth Vol. 11, no. 3 (June 1916)
  14. Mother Earth Bulletin Vol. 1, no. 5 (February 1918)
  15. Mother Earth Publishing Association. Library of Anarchism Catalog. n.p., n.d.
SEPARATION RECORD The following items have been transferred to Widener Library, Harvard University:
SEPARATION RECORD
  1. A[ugust]. Spies' Auto-biography: His Speech in Court, Notes, Letters, Etc. Chicago, Il.: Nina Van Zandt, 1887.
  2. "A Red-Hot Stinker of Scranton, PA" [pseud.] So the Railway Kings Itch for an Empire, Do They? Boston: Benjamin R. Tucker, 1885.
  3. The Accused the Accusers. The Famous Speeches. Eight Chicago Anarchists in Court. When Asked If They Had Anything to Say Why Sentence Should Not Be Passed Upon Them. On October 7th, 8th and 9th, 1886. Chicago: Socialistic Publishing Society, 1886?
  4. Aflalo, F.G. The Ethics of Performing Animals. The Balzac Library, no. 22. New York: The Tucker Pub. Co., 1900.
  5. Alarm Vol. 1, no. 2 (November 1915)
  6. Alarm Vol. 1, no. 3 (December 1915)
  7. Alarm Vol. 1, no. 5 (February 1916)
  8. Album: Funeral of P.A. Kropotkin Moscow February 13, 1921. Berlin: Foreign Bureau Russian Confederation Anarcho-Syndicalists, 1922.
  9. Alexandre, Arsene. The Thirty-Six Trades of the State. New York: Benjamin R. Tucker, 1897.
  10. Altgeld, John. Independence Day Address. Ex-Gov. John P. Altgeld of Illinois. 1897.
  11. Altgeld, John. Reasons for Pardoning Fielden, Neebe, and Schwab.
  12. The American Observer Vol. VI, no. 9 (November 2, 1936)
  13. An Appeal to President Dwight D. Eisenhower to Spare the Lives of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg. Souvenir Program, 1926.
  14. Anarchism and Outrage. Reprinted from "Freedom" for December, 1893. Freedom Pamphlets, no. 8. London: C.M. Wilson, 1893.
  15. Anarchy on Trial. Freedom Pamphlets, no. 9. London: "Freedom" Office, 1901.
  16. The Autonomist. Vol. 1, no. xii. (February 1907)
  17. Badcock, John, Jr. Slaves to Duty. New York: Benjamin R. Tucker, 1906.
  18. Bakounine, Michael. God and State. New York: Benjamin R. Tucker, 1895.
  19. Beatty, Bessie. Red Heart of Russia. New York: Century, 1919.
  20. Bell, W.S. Liberty and Morality. Boston: W.S. Bell, 1882.
  21. Berkman, Alexander. The Bolshevik Myth. New York: Boni and Liveright, 1925.
  22. Berkman, Alexander, Emma Goldman, G. Maximoff, Mark Mratchny, Rudolf Rocker, A. Shapiro, A. Souchy, Vladimir Volin, and E. Yartchuk. To the Workers of the World. Letter From Archangel. Berlin?: n.p., n.d.
  23. Bevington, L.S. Anarchism and Violence. London: "Liberty" Press, 1896.
  24. Birth Control Review Vol. III, no. 8 (August 1919)
  25. The Blast Vol. 1, no. 1 (January 15, 1916)
  26. The Blast Vol. 1, no. 2 (January 22, 1916)
  27. The Blast Vol. 1, no. 3 (January 29, 1916)
  28. The Blast Vol. 1, no. 8 (March 4, 1916)
  29. The Blast Vol. 1, no. 9 (March 15, 1916)
  30. The Blast Vol. 1, no. 24 (January 1, 1917)
  31. Boothby, Guy. A Maker of Nations. New York: Appleton, 1900.
  32. Boston Sacco and Vanzetti Defense Committee. The Story of the Sacco-Vanzetti Case including an Analysis of the Case. Roxbury, Mass., Progress Printing Company, 1921? n.d.
  33. Brann's Iconoclast Vol. XXIX, no. 9 (September 1919)
  34. Bulletin of the Relief Fund of the International Working Men's Association of the Anarchists and Anarcho-Syndicalists Imprisoned or Exiled in Russia No. 2 (March 1927)
  35. Burke, Edmund. A Vindication of Natural Society. Boston, Mass.: The Science Library, 1885. [partial, missing covers]
  36. Carlyle, Thomas. Chartism. Lovell's Literature Series, no. 40. New York: John W. Lovell Company, 1889.
  37. [Clemency Rally] Clemency for the Rosenbergs, 1953?
  38. Church, A.W. Life of Spenser. Lovell's Literature Series, no. 188. New York: John W. Lovell Company, 1891.
  39. The Clarion Vol. 1, no 6 (February 1933)
  40. The Class Struggle Vol. 2, no. 5 (December 1918)
  41. The Class Struggle Vol. 3, no. 2 (May 1919)
  42. The Commonwealth for Industrial Democracy. Vol. 1, no. 2 &3. (April-May 1919)
  43. The Comrade Vol. 3, no. 1 (October 1903)
  44. Comrade: An Illustrated Socialist Monthly November 1901.
  45. Comrade: An Illustrated Socialist Monthly March 1902.
  46. Congress of Religious Philosophies. Panama-Pacific International Exposition. San Francisco, program, 1915.
  47. Cook, Chas. H.W. The True Solution of the Labor Question. Lovell's Political and Scientific Series, No. 24. New York: John W. Lowell Company, 1890.
  48. Coryell, John Rusell. Blue Sunday. New York: Corwill Publishing Company, n.d.
  49. Coryell, John Russell. The Rent Strike. An Address Made at Lyric Hall, Sixth Avenue, near Forty-Second Street, before the Liberty Congregation. New York: Corwill Publishing Company, n.d.
  50. The Criminal Law Amendment Act. London: International Publishing Company, 1885.
  51. Dana, Charles A. Proudhon and His "Bank of the People." New York: Benjamin R. Tucker, 1896.
  52. Dannenberg, Karl. The Revolution in Germany: A Study Including Separate Essays Entitled That Dictatorship of the Proletariat and Revolutionary Socialism and the Constituent Assembly in Germany. Reprint from the January-March, 1919, issue of The Radical Review. New York: Radical Review Publishing Association, 1919.
  53. Daily American Vol. IV, no. 263 (January 21, 1950)
  54. Darrow, Clarence S. Crime and Criminals: An Address Delivered to the Prisoners in the Chicago County Jail. Chicago: Charles H. Kerr & Company, 1905.
  55. De Arme Teufel Vol. XV, no. 759 (June 17, 1899)
  56. De Arme Teufel Vol. XV, no. 760 (June 24, 1899)
  57. De Arme Teufel Vol. XV, no. 761 (July 1, 1899)
  58. The Demonstrator (July 4, 1906)
  59. The Dial Vol. 65, no. 779 (December 14, 1918)
  60. The Dial Vol. 66, no. 781 (January 11, 1919)
  61. The Dial Vol. 66, no. 787 (April 5, 1919)
  62. Doyle, Dallan. The Emancipation of Society from Government. Free Society Library, no. 3. San Francisco: Free Society Publishing Co., 1898.
  63. Dufougeray, L. King Lohengrin. Balzac Library, no. 40. New York: Tucker Pub. Co., 1900.
  64. The Emancipator Vol. I, no. 1 (October 1906)
  65. The Emancipator Vol. I, no. 3 (May 1907)
  66. Entozoa: Treatise. The Symptoms and Effects. New York: Prof. A.W. Allen, 1881.
  67. Evening Post Magazine Vol. 117, no. 308 (November 14, 1918)
  68. Evening Post Magazine Vol. 118, no. 160 (May 24, 1919)
  69. Everyman Vol. 10
  70. Everyman Vol. 11
  71. Facts Worth Knowing. Brooklyn Philosophical Association, n.d.
  72. Financial Report of the Sacco & Vanzetti Defense Committee from the date of organization, May 5, 1920-July 31, 1925. Sacco and Vanzetti Defense Committee, 1925.
  73. The Firebrand Vol. II, no. 7, whole no. 111 (March 21, 1897)
  74. The Firebrand Vol. II, no. 27, whole no. 131 (August 1, 1897)
  75. Flieβ, Wilhelm Gegen. Bisexualität. Das Geschlecht, heft 1. Berlin-Steglitz: H. Pudor Verlag, 1906.
  76. For a Lasting Peace, For a People's Democracy No. 29 (July 16, 1954)
  77. For a Lasting Peace, For a People's Democracy No. 34 (August 21, 1954)
  78. Francisco Ferrer Association [Newsletter] No. 1, n.d.
  79. Francisco Ferrer Association [Newsletter] No. 2, n.d.
  80. Francisco Ferrer Association [Newsletter] No. 4, n.d.
  81. Freedom Vol. XI, no. 117 (June-July, 1897)
  82. Freedom Vol. XX, no. 209 (August 1906)
  83. Freedom Vol. XXIV, no. 251 (April 1910)
  84. Freedom Vol. XXVIII, no. 298 (February 1914)
  85. Freedom Vol. XXIX, no. 310 (February 1915)
  86. Freedom Vol. XXIX, no. 315 (July 1915)
  87. Freedom Vol. XXIX, no. 320 (December 1915)
  88. Freedom Vol. XXXIII, no. 359 (April 1919)
  89. Freedom Vol. XXXV, no. 380 (February 1921)
  90. Freedom Vol. XLI, no. 441 (March 1927)
  91. Freedom Vol. XLI, no. 443 (June 1927)
  92. Freedom Vol. XLI, no. 445 (Sept-October 1927)
  93. Freedom [Anarchist Pamphlets, Freedom Press] Nos. 4-5, n.d.
  94. Freedom [Freedom Publishing Group, New York] Vol. 1, no. 1 (January 15, 1919)
  95. Freedom [Freedom Publishing Group, New York] Vol. 1, no. 3 (March 15, 1919)
  96. Free Society Vol. VI, no. 11, whole no. 251 (January 28, 1900)
  97. Free Society Vol. VII, nos. 31-39, whole nos. 329-337 (September 1-November 24, 1901)
  98. Free Society Vol. IX, nos. 37-49, whole nos. 379-391 (September 14-December 7, 1902)
  99. Fox, Jay. Trade Unionism and Anarchism: A Letter to a Brother Unionist. n.d.
  100. Freedom Bulletin No. 11 (December 1930)
  101. George, Henry. The Land Question: What It Involves and How Alone It Can Be Settled. Webster Library, no. 12. New York: Charles L. Webster & Co., 1893.
  102. Glass, Henry. The Superstition of Government. and P. Kropotkin. Organised Vengeance, Called Justice. Freedom Library. London: "Freedom" Office, 1902.
  103. Good Morning. Vol. II, no. 7-8 (August15-September 1, 1920)
  104. Goodhue, Benjamin W. Breeding Tigers. Wage Slavery in the United States. Liberty Library, Vol. 1, no. 13. Chicago, Ill.: J.M. Foley, 1887.
  105. Gorsuch, W.J. Revolt! An American to Americans. Allegheny, PA: International Working People's Association, Group no. 1, 1885.
  106. Grave, Jean. Moribund Society and Anarchy. Translated from the French by Voltairine De Cleyre. Free Society Library, no. 2. San Francisco: Free Society Library, 1899.
  107. Gronlund, Laurence. Insufficiency of Henry George's Theory. New York Labor Library, no. 5. New York: New York Labor News Company, 1887.
  108. Harden, Maximilian. When We, Dead, Awaken. The Balzac Library, no. 57. New York: The Tucker Pub. Co., 1900.
  109. Haywood, William D. The General Strike. New York: Buccafori Defense Committee. Show Workers Union, No. 168, n.d.
  110. Henry, Agnes. Anarchist Communism in its Relation to State Socialism. London : James Tochatti, 1896. [partial]
  111. Holmes, Wlm. The Historical Philosophical and Economical Bases of Anarchy. Liberty Library, no. 1. Columbus Junction, Iowa: E.H. Fulton, n.d.
  112. I.F. Stone's Weekly. Vol. 2, no. 30 (August 16, 1954)
  113. Jacobs, Joseph. The Dying of Death. The Balzac Library, no. 11. The Tucker Publishing Co., 1900.
  114. Jakoby, Dr. Johann. The Object of the Labor Movement. New York Labor Library, no. 1. New York: New York Labor News Company, 1887.
  115. James, C.L. Anarchism and Malthus. Mother Earth Publishing Association, 1910.
  116. James, C.L. Origin of Anarchism. Chicago: A. Isaak Publisher, 1902.
  117. The Jewish Immigration Bulletin Vol. 9, no. 7 (December 1919)
  118. Jobert, A. Die Frauen und der Krieg. Brussels: Verlag W. Schouteten, 1909.
  119. Klein, Rudolf. The Painter of Sin. The Balzac Library, no. 53. New York: Tucker Pub. Co., 1900.
  120. Knickerbocker Press (November 12, 1918)
  121. Korshet, Dr. Morris. The Pathway to Individual Freedom. n.p., n.d.
  122. Krapotkine, Peter. Revolutionare Regierungen. Anarchistisch-communistische Bibliothek. London: Gruppe "Autonomie," n.d.
  123. Kropotkin, Peter. Agriculture. Chiswick (UK): Liberty Press, James Tochatt, 1896.
  124. Kropotkin, Peter. An Appeal to the Young. Chicago: Free Society, 1901.
  125. Kropotkin, Peter. An Appeal to the Young. London: William Reeves, n.d.
  126. Kropotkin, Peter. Anarchism: Its Philosophy and Ideal. Freedom Pamphlet, no. 10. London: "Freedom" Office, 1907.
  127. Kropotkin, Peter. The Coming Revival of Socialism. Freedom Pamphlet, no. 15. London: "Freedom" Office," n.d.
  128. Kropotkin, Peter. The Commune of Paris. and Elisee Recluse. An Anarchist on Anarchy. Liberty Library, no. 3. Columbus Junction, Iowa: E.H. Fulton, 1896.
  129. Kropotkin, Peter. Expropriation. London : Freedom Office, [1909?]. [partial]
  130. Kropotkin, Peter. The Wage System. Free Society Library, no. 7. San Francisco, CA: Free Society Library, 1898.
  131. Kropotkin, Peter. Worte Eine Rebellen. n.p., n.d.
  132. Kropotkine, Peter. Anarchist Communism: Its Basis and Principles. Freedom Pamphlet, No. 4. London: "Freedom" Office, 1905.
  133. Kropotkine, Pierre. War! London: International Publishing Company, 1886.
  134. Lanin, E.B. Russian Characteristics. Twentieth Century Library, no. 56. New York: Humboldt Publishing Co., 1894.
  135. Lanin, E.B. Russian Traits and Terrors. Boston: Benjamin R. Tucker, 1891.
  136. Lassalle, Ferdinand. The Working Man's Programme. London: The Modern Press, 1884.
  137. Lazarus, M.E., M.D. Gold: the Autocrat of Exchange. London: International Publishing Company, 1887.
  138. Lenin, N. Left Wing Communism: An Infantile Disorder. Detroit: Marxian Educational Society, 1921.
  139. Lenin, N. The Proletarian Revolution.Detroit: The Marxian Educational Society, n.d.
  140. Lewis, Leon. The Facts Concerning the Eight Condemned Leaders. Greenport, New York: Leon Lewis, 1887.
  141. The Liberator [Chicago] Vol. 1, no. 17 (December 24, 1905)
  142. Liberator Vol. 1, no. 5 (July 1918) - Vol. 4, no. 8 (August 1921)
  143. Libertarian Vol. 1, no. 1 (May 1968)
  144. Liberty: The Pioneer Organ of Anarchism Vol. xv, No. 2 (April 1906) - Vol. xv, No. 4 (August 1906)
  145. Mackay, John Henry. The Anarchists: A Picture of Civilization at the Close of the Nineteenth Century. Boston: Benjamin R. Tucker, 1891.
  146. Malatesta, Enrico. Anarchy. and James F. Morton, Jr. Is It All a Dream? Free Society Library, No. 5. San Francisco: Free Society Library, 1900.
  147. Manifesto of the Communists. New York: International Workingmens Association, 1883.
  148. The Masters of Life: An Interview by Maxim Gorky. Translated by M. Zaslaw. Mother Earth Publishing Association, n.d.
  149. "The Meaning of the Radical Movement" Hutchins Hapgood, 1915.
  150. Message to Labor from David Caplan and M.A. Schmidt. Dated Los Angeles County Bastile, Labor Day 1915, 1915.
  151. Minor, Robert. The Frame-Up System: Oxman Perjury Plot. 3rd ed. San Francisco: International Worker’s Defense League, 1917. [missing cover and pages?]
  152. Minor, Robert. Justice Raped in California. 4th ed. San Francisco, Tom Mooney Molders Defense Committee [1917?]
  153. The Modern School Vol. 2, nos. 2-3 (February-March 1915)
  154. The Modernist Vol. 1, no. 1 (November 1919)
  155. Mooney Molders Defense Committee. Governor Young: Pardon Tom Mooney-Innocent. San Francisco, 1929.
  156. Mooney Molders Defense Committee. Governor Young: Pardon Tom Mooney-Innocent. San Francisco: Tom Mooney Molder’s Defense Committee, 1930.
  157. Morris, William. Chants for Socialists. London: The Socialist League, 1892.
  158. Morton, Jr., James F. Another Blow to Royalty. Free Society Library, no. 6. San Francisco: Free Society Library, September, 1900.
  159. Most, John. The Beast of Property. 2d ed. New Haven: International Workingmen's Association, n.d.
  160. Murray, Sean and the Irish Workers' Club. Ireland's Fight for Freedom and the Irish in the U.S.A. New York: Workers' Library Publishers, 1934.
  161. The Nation Vol. 107, no. 2781 (October 19, 1918) (International Relations Section) - Vol. 112, no. 2910 (April 13, 1921) (book supplement)
  162. The Nation. Russian Reprints from The Nation of November 16th, 23rd, and 30th, n.d.
  163. Nettlau, Max. Errico Malatesta: The Biography of an Anarchist. New York: Jewish Anarchist Federation, 1924.
  164. The New Republic Vol. 17, no. 216 (December 21st 1918) - Vol. 19, no. 237 (May 17th 1919)
  165. New York Call (scattered) (1918-1921)
  166. New York Communist Vol. 1, no. 1 (April 19, 1919)
  167. New York Communist Vol. 1, no. 3 (May 1, 1919)
  168. Nieuwenhuis, F. Domela. The Pyramid of Tyranny. Freedom Pamphlets, No. 13 London: "Freedom" Office, 1901.
  169. The Nineteenth Century Vol. 5., no. 27 (May 1879) - Vol. 32, no. 186 (August 1892)
  170. Oficinas de Propaganda C.N.T. F.A.I. 19 Julio 1936 España Barcelona :C.N.T. F.A.I.,1936?
  171. The Official Bulletin of the Sacco-Vanzetti Defense Committee of Boston, Massachusetts. Vol. 1, no. 4, 6, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18? (September 1926-1927)
  172. Olgin, M.J. Why Communism? Plain Talks on Vital Problems. New York: Workers Library Publishers, n.d.
  173. Ouida. Unwritten Literary Laws. The Balzac Library, no. 56. New York: Tucker Pub. Co., 1900.
  174. Parsons, Albert R.. The Great Anarchist Trial. The Haymarket Speech. Chicago: Chicago Labor Press Association, 1886.
  175. Paul, Herbert. The Prince of Journalists. Balzac Library, no. 10. New York: Tucker Pub. Co., 1900.
  176. Pearson's Magazine Vol. 46, no. 3 (September 1920)
  177. Phillips, Wendell. The Labor Question. Boston: Lee and Shepard, 1884.
  178. Plechanoff, George. Anarchism & Socialism. Translated by Eleanor Marx Aveling. London: 20th Century Press, 1906.
  179. PM Daily (scattered) (1942-1946)
  180. PM Sunday (scattered) (1943)
  181. Poet Lore Vol. 15, no. 6 (Winter 1914)
  182. Prevost, Marcel. The French Novel in the Nineteenth Century. New York: The Tucker Publishing Company, n.d.
  183. The Proletarian Vol. 2, no. 1 (May 1919)
  184. Proudhon, P.J.. What is Property? Humboldt Library of Science, no. 172. New York: Humboldt Publishing Co., 1893.
  185. The Public: A Journal of Democracy. Vol. XXII (April 5, 1919)
  186. The Purpose of the Universal Brotherhood and Theosophical Society. Adapted for Inquirers. The Path Series. Point Loma, CA: The Aryan Theosophical Press, n.d.
  187. The Radical Review October-December 1918.
  188. "Read, Read, and Think! United States Government Shows How to Kill...The Trusts..." Cigar Makers' Union of Brooklyn, n.d.
  189. The Rebel Worker Vol. II, no. 5 (April 1, 1919)
  190. The Rebel Worker Vol. II, no. 7 (May 1, 1919)
  191. Reclus, Elisee. Evolution and Revolution. London: International Publishing Company, 1886.
  192. Reclus, Elisee. Evolution and Revolution. London: Reeves, n.d.
  193. Resistance Vol. 11, no. 1 (August 1953)
  194. Resolutions passed at the Anarchist Congress held at Amsterdam August 24-31, 1907. London International Bureau, 1907.
  195. Revolt Vol. 1, no. 2 (January 15, 1916)
  196. Revolt Vol. 1, no. 3 (January 22, 1916)
  197. Revolt Vol. 1, no. 5 (February 5, 1916)
  198. Revolt Vol. 1, no. 6 (February 12, 1916)
  199. Revolt Vol. 1, no. 7 (February 19, 1916)
  200. The Revolutionary Age Vol. 1, no. 8 (December 14, 1918)
  201. The Revolutionary Age Vol. 1, no. 9 (December 18, 1918)
  202. The Revolutionary Age Vol. 1, no. 13 (January 11, 1919)
  203. The Revolutionary Age Vol. 1, no. 17 (February 8, 1919)
  204. The Revolutionary Age Vol. 1, no. 19 (February 22, 1919)
  205. The Revolutionary Age Vol. 1, no. 20 (March 1, 1919)
  206. The Revolutionary Age Vol. 1, no. 22 (March 15, 1919)
  207. The Revolutionary Age Vol. 1, no. 23 (March 22, 1919)
  208. The Revolutionary Age Vol. 1, no. 24 (March 29, 1919)
  209. The Revolutionary Age Vol. 1, no. 25 (April 5, 1919)
  210. The Revolutionary Age Vol. 1, no. 29 (May 3, 1919)
  211. The Revolutionary Age Vol. 1, no. 30 (May 10, 1919)
  212. The Road to Freedom Vol. III, no. 6 (January 1927)
  213. The Road to Freedom Vol. III, no. 11 (June 1927)
  214. The Road to Freedom Vol. IV, no. 8 (March 1928)
  215. The Road to Freedom Vol. IV, no. 9 (April 1928)
  216. The Road to Freedom Vol. V, no. 5 (January 1929)
  217. The Road to Freedom Vol. V, no. 7 (March 1929)
  218. The Road to Freedom Vol. V, no. 8 (April 1929)
  219. The Road to Freedom Vol. V, no. 10 (June 1929)
  220. The Road to Freedom Vol. VI, no. 12 (August 1930)
  221. The Road to Freedom Vol. VII, no. 7 (March 1931)
  222. Roller, Arnold. The Social General Strike. Translated from the German by F.K. Chicago: Debating Club, no. 1, 1905.
  223. The Roosevelt Record Vol. I, no. 23 (October 26, 1936)
  224. Ruskin, John. Aratra Pentelici. Six Lectures on the Elements of Sculpture. New York: John W. Lovell Co., 1870.
  225. Russia and the British Labor Delegation's Report: A Reply. British Committee for the Defence of Political Prisoners in Russia, 1925?
  226. The Russian Constitution. Adopted July 10, 1918. Reprint. New York: The Nation, 1919.
  227. The Russian Revolution and the Communist Party. Russian Revolution Series, no. 2. Berlin: "Der Syndikalist," 1922.
  228. Save Your Brothers Tortured in the Prisons of Russia. To All Labor and Revolutionary Organisations! Berlin: Secretariat of the International Workers Association, n.d.
  229. Scarlet Review. Seattle: Equity Printing Co., n.d.
  230. Schroeder, Theodore. The Criminal Anarchy Law & On Suppressing the Advocacy of Crime. Mother Earth Publishing Association, 1907.
  231. Schroeder, Theodore. Culture and Culturine Being a Few Wise and Wicked Remarks. n.p. n.d.
  232. Schroeder, Theodore. Paternal Legislation: A Study of Liberty. Reprint. New York: Theodore Schroeder, n.d.
  233. Sentenced to Twenty Years Prison. New York: Political Prisoners Defense and Relief Committee, 1919.
  234. Seymour, Henry. The Anarchy of Love. London: Henry Seymour, 1888.
  235. Seymour, Henry. Michael Bakounine: A Biographical Sketch. London: Henry Seymour, 1888.
  236. Seymour, Henry. P.J. Proudhon: A Biographical Sketch. London: International Publishing Company, n.d.
  237. Smith, Goldwin. Life of Cowper. Lovell's Literature Series, no. 187. New York: John W. Lovell Company, 1891.
  238. Smith, J. Blair. Direct Action Versus Legislation. Free Action Pamphlets, no. 1. Glasgow: The Free Action Anarchist Group, n.d.
  239. The Socialist Vol. 1, no. 1 (April 29, 1919)
  240. Social Science Journal Vol. 1, no. 7 (January 15, 1901)
  241. Social Solutions no. 4-no. 7. Lovell's Library, no. 778. New York: John W. Lovell Company, 1886.
  242. Social Solutions, n.d.
  243. The Socialist Review Vol. 8, no. 3 ( February 1920) - Vol. 9, no. 1 (June 1920)
  244. Solidarity Vol. 1, no 10 (April 1, 1898)
  245. Solidarity Vol. 1, no 11 (April 15, 1898)
  246. Solidarity Vol. 1, no 12 (May 1, 1898)
  247. Solidarity [Workingmen for Workingmen] Vol. I, no. 4 (May 1902)
  248. Soviet Russia Vol. 1, no. 12 (August 23, 1919) - Vol. 5, no. 5 (November 1921)
  249. The Soviet World Vol. I, no. 2 (March 8, 1919)
  250. Spooner, Lysander. Gold and Silver as Standards of Value. Boston: A. Williams and Co., 1878.
  251. The Spur Vol. 1, no. 6 (November 1914)
  252. Steinle, E. The True Aim of Anarchism. Liberty Library, no. 4. Columbus Junction, Iowa: E.W. Fulton, 1896.
  253. Strindberg, August. Have Plants Nerve? The Balzac Library, no. 13. New York: The Tucker Pub. Co., 1900?
  254. Strindberg, August. Miss Julie. A Play in One Act by August Strindberg. Translated by Horace B. Samuel. London: Hendersons, 1914.
  255. Struggling Russia Vol. 1, no. 1 (March 22, 1919)
  256. Sutherland, Alexander. The Natural Decline of Warfare. The Balzac Library, no. 58. New York :Tucker Pub. Co., 1900.
  257. Tcherkesoff, W. Pages of Socialist History: Teachings and Acts of Social Democracy. New York: C.B. Cooper, 1902.
  258. Tolstoi, Count Leo. The Fruits of Culture. Boston: Benjamin R. Tucker, 1891.
  259. Tolstoi, Count Lyof N. The Krentzer Sonata. Translated by Frederic Lyster. New York: Pollard Publishing Company, 1890.
  260. The Torch: A Revolutionary Journal of Anarchist-Communism Vol. 2, no. 3 (August 18, 1895) - Vol. 2, no. 5 (October 18, 1895)
  261. Trumbull, Gen. M.M. in behalf of the condemned anarchists. Was it a Fair Trial? An Appeal to the Governor of Illinois. n.d.
  262. The Truth Seeker Vol. 21, no. 8 (February 24, 1906)
  263. Tucker, Benjamin R. The Attitude of Anarchism Toward Industrial Combinations. New York: Benjamin R. Tucker, 1903.
  264. Tucker, Benjamin R. Benjamin R. Tucker's Unique Catalogue of Advanced Literature. New York: Tucker Pub. Co., 1906.
  265. Tucker, Benjamin R. Henry George, Traitor. New York: Benjamin R. Tucker, 1896.
  266. Ulianov, V.I. (Lenin, N.) The State and Revolution. Marxist Teaching on the State and the Task of the Proletariat in the Revolution. United Communist Party of America, n.d.
  267. Van Ornum, W.H. Mating or Marrying, Which? Free Society Library, no. 5. San Francisco: Free Society Library, 1898.
  268. Vanguard: A Libertarian Communist Journal Vol. 2, no. 5 (October-November 1935) - Vol. 4, no. 5 & 6 (November 1938)
  269. Vanzetti, Bartolomeo. Background of the Plymouth Trial. Boston: Road to Freedom Group, 1927?
  270. Verestchagin, Vassili. Reminiscences of Meissonier. New York: Tucker Pub. Co., n.d.
  271. The Voice of Labor Vol. 1, no 1 (January 18, 1907)
  272. Was Billings Tried or Railroaded? Reprint. Oakland, CA: Tri-City Labor Review, n.d.
  273. Weekly Bulletin of the Bureau of Information of Soviet Russia Vol. I, no. 1 (March 3, 1919)
  274. Weekly Bulletin of the Bureau of Information of Soviet Russia Vol. I, no. 6 (April 7, 1919)
  275. What Happens in Military Prisons: The Public is Entitled to the Facts. Chicago: n.p., 1918.
  276. Williams, Albert Rhys. [76 Questions and Answers on] The Bolsheviks and the Soviets. New York: Rand School of Social Science, n.d.
  277. Winn's Firebrand Vol. III, no. 1 (October 2, 1909)
  278. The Woman Rebel Vol. 1, no. 6 (August 1914)
  279. Woodruff, Abner E., C.E. The Advancing Proletariat. Cleveland: I.W.W. Publishing Bureau, 1914.
  280. The Workers' Friend Vol. XXIX, no. 4 (October 1, 1915)
  281. The World Scene From the Libertarian Point of View. Chicago: Free Society Group of Chicago, 1951.
  282. The World Tomorrow. A Journal Looking Towards A Christian World. Vol. II, no. 1 (January 1919) - (June 1919)
  283. Workers’ Council Vol. 1, no. 3 (May 1, 1921)
  284. Young Democracy Vol. 1, no. 1 (April 15, 1919)
  285. Young Democracy Vol. 1, no. 3 (May 15, 1919)
SEPARATION RECORD The following items were discarded:
SEPARATION RECORD
  1. New York Times (picture section only) (June 1, 1919)
  2. New York Times (picture section only) (April 18, 1920)
  3. New York Times (April 19, 1955)

MICROFILM OF COLLECTION

  1. The following informationapplies to all the collections included in this microfilm project.
  2. 1. All dates and other information added by the processor are in square brackets.
  3. 2. The pages of some items were numbered to aid the microfilmer, the proofreader, andthe researchers. Blank pages were not numbered.
  4. 3. All reels were proofread by the processor and corrections were made where necessary.These corrections may disrupt the sequence of frame numbers.
  5. 4. Some of the material in this collection was difficult to film, due to such problems asflimsy paper with text showing through, faded and blurred carbons, smudged text, and creasedpaper. The film was carefully produced and proofread to ensure that these items are as legible aspossible.
  6. 5. The picture side of postcards were microfilmed only if they were of special importance.
  7. 6. Photographs were microfilmed with the collection. They will also be filmed with theSchlesinger Library's photograph collections.
  8. 7. The versos of envelopes were microfilmed only if they contained a returned address ornotes.
  9. 8. Letters of one or more pages with either the salutation or the signature missing, as wellas portions of the letters, have been marked as fragments.
  10. 9. Copies of this microfilm edition of the Malmed-Goldman Papers and the smallcollections included with them (M-88) may be purchased from the Schlesinger Library,Radcliffe Institute, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138.
REEL GUIDE:

For a list of the contents of MC 332 see the inventory that follows. For descriptions of the Fannie Dorothy Garfinkle Barrett Papers (A/B274), the Daniel Malmed Papers (A/M256), and the Lillian and William Mendelsohn Papers (A/M537), use the links, or see the inventory that precedes each of these collections on reel 6. When requesting microfilm material, please use the microfilm number (M-88) and the reel number.
  1. Folders 1-14: M-88, Reel 1
  2. Folders 15-30: M-88, Reel 2
  3. Folders 31-39: M-88, Reel 3
  4. Folders 40-48: M-88, Reel 4
  5. Folders 49-61: M-88, Reel 5
  6. Folders 62-79: M-88, Reel 6
  7. A/B274: M-88, Reel 6
  8. A/M256: M-88, Reel 6
  9. A/M537: M-88, Reel 6
GLOSSARY OF INITIALS
  1. AB = Alexander Berkman
  2. SC = Stella Coymn (later Ballantine)
  3. EG = Emma Goldman
  4. LML = Living My Life
  5. LM = Leon Malmed
  6. ME = Mother Earth
  7. MDIR = My Disillusionment in Russia
  8. BR = Ben Reitman
  9. NS = Nunia Seldes
  10. WSVV = W[arren] S[tarr] Van Valkenburgh
Container list
  1. Box 1: folders 1-18
  2. Box 2: folders 19-35
  3. Box 3: folders 36-48
  4. Box 4: folders 49-63
  5. Box 5: folders 64-77
INDEX OF CORRESPONDENTS This index includes the names, when known, of all writers and recipients of letters, both individuals and organizations, with one exception: little-known persons writing for organizations are not indexed, while the organizations are. Information about individuals and subjects is not indexed, nor are enclosures that are not letters, with the exception of Leon Malmed manuscript notes. All enclosures are described in the inventory.

The senders of telegrams in #63 are indexed but not individually listed in the inventory.

Some letters, particularly from Emma Goldman to others and others to Emma Goldman, are carbon copies or transcripts. This information is included in the inventory. (The number refers to folders.)

Key: No Symbol = Writer; * = Writer and Recipient; + = Recipient
INDEX OF CORRESPONDENTS
  1. Abbott, Leonard D. 59+
  2. Ackerman, M. 54
  3. Alexander Berkman Aid Fund 70
  4. Alsberg, Henry Garfield 56+, 57
  5. Baginski, Max 16, 26
  6. Balabanoff, Angelica 67+
  7. Baldwin, Roger Nash 31+, 60*, 63*
  8. Ballantine, Stella-see Stella Comyn
  9. Barnsdall, Aline 60+
  10. Bates, ? J. 12
  11. Bauer, ? 1
  12. [Beldner?], Sophie 18
  13. Bell, Thomas H. 58+, 63
  14. Benson, Elsie 18
  15. Berkman, Alexander 3-6, 8, 9, 11, 20, 22, 25, 26, 57, 72
  16. Bernstein, Rose 63
  17. Brandschain, Abe 4
  18. Browne, Maurice 64
  19. Caplan, Phil 16
  20. Chicago Free Society Group 63
  21. Chicago Southside Liberation Group 63
  22. Cohen, Joseph 55+
  23. Cohn, Dr. Michael 45+, 58+
  24. Commins, Saxe 63
  25. Comyn, Stella 22, 23, 25, 26*, 27*, 29, 30*, 35-37
  26. Cook, Cassius V. 63, 68+
  27. Cooper, Morris 4
  28. [Coops?], ? 63+
  29. Craig, Nellie 17
  30. Defense Committee of the Kotoku Conference 74
  31. Dresser, Joe 33+
  32. Dreiser, Theodore 56*
  33. Ellis, Havelock 31*
  34. Emma Goldman Drama lecture Group 63
  35. Emma Goldman lecture Committee 63
  36. Emma Goldman memorial Committee 69
  37. Emma Goldman Publication Fund 63
  38. Eyges, Tom 1
  39. Fife, Hamilton 31+
  40. Fitzgerald, M[ary] Eleanor 24, 26*, 27*
  41. Flechine, Senya 64+
  42. Francisco Ferrer Association 8
  43. Freedom 73
  44. Freeman, Alden 59
  45. Freie Arbeiter Stimme 63
  46. "Freiheit" Publishing Association 2, 4
  47. Friends of Emma Goldman 69
  48. Gerson, Dr. T. Perceval 56+
  49. Gesang Verein Concordia 5
  50. Goldman, Emma 2-20, 21*, 22, 23*, 24-31, 32*, 33-44, 45*, 46 47*,48*, 49-55, 56*, 57*, 58, 59, 60*, 61, 62, 63*, 64*, 65, 66, 67*, 68*, 71, 73, 74*
  51. Goldman family 63
  52. Goldman, Morris ("Moe") 45
  53. Goldstein, Marjorie 63*
  54. [Gruening?], Mart[ha] 58+
  55. Hanline, Maurice A. 56
  56. Handshear, J. and Handshear, Mrs. J. 63
  57. Hapgood, Hutchins 8+
  58. Harman Reception Committee 3
  59. Hartmann, (Carl) Sadakichi 4
  60. Hershman, H. 61
  61. Holmes, John Haynes 55+, 56+, 59+, 63*, 69
  62. Huxley, Aldous 66*
  63. [Inglis?], Agnes 24+
  64. International Workers' Defense League 21
  65. Isaak, A. 1
  66. Janoff, Sophia 67
  67. Kassel, John 58+
  68. Kerr, Stewart 55+
  69. Knopf, Alfred A. 57, 59+
  70. Korobovkinya?, M. 26
  71. Lang, Lucy 56+
  72. Lang, Lucy and Bob 20
  73. Langbord, Morris and Becky 63
  74. League for the Amnesty of Political Prisoners 25
  75. Leibovitz, Osias 1
  76. Levine, Issac Don 45+, 48
  77. Levy, Herman H. 5
  78. Levy, Jeanne 67+
  79. Levy, Ralph H. 4, 5
  80. Libreria Sociologica 6
  81. Little Review 11
  82. [Lord?], Ann 63
  83. Lyons, Eugene 66+
  84. Maisel, Max N. 4
  85. Malmed, Daniel 61+
  86. Malmed, Leon 1+ - 6+, 8+, 9+, 11+ - 15+, 16*, 17+ - 26+, 27*, 28+ -55+, 56*, 57+, 58+, 60+ - 62+, 63*, 64+ - 68+, 69*, 70+, 73+, 74+
  87. Malmet, Lillie 16
  88. Mandell, Ben 15-17, 20
  89. Maximov 58+
  90. Meelis, Dien 64+, 69
  91. Mesirow, Mildred 63+
  92. Morgen, H. 16, 17
  93. Mother Earth 4
  94. Murrow, Charles 1
  95. Nettlau, Max 57+, 58+
  96. Newlander, Carl 22
  97. New York Publicity Committee of the Alexander Berkman SanFrancisco Labor Defense 22
  98. New York State Library 5
  99. Palmer, Mr. 63+
  100. Phoenix, F.C. 16, 17
  101. Pond, James 61+
  102. Powys, John [Cowper] 64+
  103. Reitman, Ben Lewis 8+, 9, 10+, 20+
  104. Road To Freedom 53+
  105. Robinson, William J. 59+
  106. Rocker, Milly 63+
  107. Rocker, Rudolf 55+, 63+, 67+, 68+
  108. Ross, Arthur Leonard 57*, 63
  109. Rothberg, J. 22, 24
  110. Rothberg, Joseph 3
  111. Sacco, Nicola 51+
  112. Sanger, Margaret 20, 38
  113. S'anchez, Saornil, Lucia 67
  114. Santillan, [Diego Abad de] 67
  115. Schapiro, A[lexander Moses] 5
  116. Scott, Evelyn 48, 57+, 59+, 63+
  117. Seldes, George S. 5+, 72+
  118. Seldes, Nunia 2+, 5+ - 9+, 54, 71+, 72+
  119. Shane, Bernard and Emma 63
  120. Simkin, Sophie 51-55
  121. Simons, H. Austin 24
  122. Souchy, Augustin 67
  123. Sprading, Charles T. 53+
  124. Steimer, Molly 55, 64+
  125. Suponitsky, F. 9
  126. Thompson, Phoebe 56+
  127. Trade Union Conference for the Defense of the California Labor Cases 22
  128. Van Valkenburgh, W[arren] S[tarr] 14-17, 19, 21, 23, 24, 31*, 32, 33,35, 36, 38, 40, 45, 47-49, 51+, 59+, 74
  129. Vanzetti, Bartolomeo 51+
  130. Vazquez, [Mariano R.] 67*, 68
  131. Weinberger, Harry 50+, 63
  132. Wexler, ? 61+
  133. White, Eliot 58+
  134. White, Eliot and Mabel R. 68
  135. Whitehead, J. Gordon 63+
  136. Workingmens Furniture Fire Insurance 1-3
  137. Yaffe, H[yman] 63
  138. Yanofsky, [Saul] 73
  139. Yanowitz, J. 22
  140. Zetlin, Jacob 5
  141. Zuckerman, Mandel 16

Processing Information

Processed: June 1983

By: Bert Hartry
Link to catalog
Title
Goldman, Emma, 1869-1940. Papers of Leon Malmed and Emma Goldman, 1899-1982 (inclusive), 1899-1940 (bulk): A Finding Aid
Author
Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America
EAD ID
sch00027

Repository Details

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