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COLLECTIONS: 21 - 30 of 936

Adams Sugar Refinery records

Collection Identifier: Mss:424 1865-1869 A217
Overview: The Adams of Adams Sugar Refinery was Isaac Adams of Sandwich, N.H. The collection consists of 2 letter books and a journal.

Adler and Childs Department Store records

Collection Identifier: Mss:776 1933-50 A237
Overview: Partial records, gathered for a case study, of a department store in Dayton, Ohio which closed in 1950.

Adonijah Upton ledger

Collection Identifier: Mss:871 1764-1814 U71
Scope and Contents: Ledger of glazier Adonijah Upton, of Dighton, Massachusetts, recording debits and credits related to his business, dating from 1763 to 1814. Common charges were for priming window sashes, setting squares of glass, and mending glass and leadlights, in addition to painting windows. Upton performed glazing work on homes, ships, and public buildings. Barter payments were in the form of labor and commodities, such as iron, lumber, molasses, wool, and flax, but many entries indicate his clients paid...

Advertising ephemera collection

Collection Identifier: Vis 29
Overview: This artificial collection contains a variety of advertising materials, including trade cards, clipper ship cards, business cards, labels, and posters. Also included are scrapbooks of advertising trade cards and other ephemera, as well as greeting cards, calling cards and rewards of merit.

African-American Student Union records

Collection Identifier: Arch DE 2.10A.1
Scope and Contents: The records of the African-American Student Union (AASU) at Harvard Business School cover the period of its beginning in the late 1960s to the present day. The bulk of the materials date from 1969-1971 and 1985-1994, under the deanships of George B. Baker (1961-1970), Lawrence E. Fouraker (1970-1980) and John H. McArthur (1980-1995). The records in this collection document the various directions taken at HBS in response to the demands of AASU including educational and admissions...

Agriculture printed matter collection

Collection Identifier: Mss: 1 1810-1889 A
Overview: This artificial collection contains a variety of printed materials related to the agricultural industry.

A.H. Hews and Company, Inc./Lockwood Products, Inc. records

Collection Identifier: Mss:605 1780-1984 H613
Abstract: The records of A. H. Hews and Company and its successor company, Lockwood Products, Inc. cover the period of its beginning in the eighteenth century until the mid-1990s. The records in this collection document early examples of products manufactured - Hews invented the stacking flower pot in 1888 - and sold by a company which remained in the same family for four generations

AI. A. Rosenbush Company records

Collection Identifier: Mss:773 1903-1932
Scope and Contents: Minutes, account books and unbound materials of a firm which was one of the first to distribute low cost shoes by means of concessions leased in stores across the country. There are records for predecessor firms, including Boston Sample Shoe Shop, Inc. (of Philadelphia and Seattle), Boston Shoe Shop, Inc. (Portland, Me.), Sample Shoe Shop, and Berland Sample Shoe Shop. Records of the concessions in some sixty-nine stores include copies of leases, tax papers, and correspondence; bound accounts...

A.L. Avery & Son business records

Collection Identifier: Mss:77 1864-1940 A954
Overview: Business records of the Charlemont, Massachusetts general store A.L. Avery & Son, owned and operated by five generations of the Avery family.

Alabama Mining Institute photograph albums

Collection Identifier: Mss:351 1922-1923 A316
Scope and Contents: The two albums contain 153 black and white photographs that depict the company-owned houses and other buildings provided by twelve member companies of the Alabama Mining Institute in 1922 and 1923. The photographs show houses, schools, churches, boarding houses, commissaries, and other buildings in Alabama coal mining towns. Each set of photographs depicts the separate houses, schools, and other facilities that each company provided for its white workers and for its African American workers....