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COLLECTION Identifier: MC 309

Papers of Mary E. (Mary Elisabeth) Dreier, 1797-1968 (inclusive), 1897-1968 (bulk)

Correspondence, day books, financial records, and photographs of Mary Dreier, social reformer, from Brooklyn, New York.

Dates

  • 1797-1968
  • Majority of material found within 1897-1968

Language of Materials

Materials in English and German.

Access Restrictions:

Access. Collection is open for research.

Conditions Governing Use

Copyright. Copyright in the papers created by Mary Elisabeth Dreier is held by the President and Fellows of Harvard College for the Schlesinger Library. Copyright in other papers in the collection may be held by their authors, or the authors' heirs or assigns.

Copying. Papers may be copied in accordance with the library's usual procedures.

Extent

11.26 linear feet ((27 file boxes) plus 2 folio folders, 1 folio+ folder,1 oversize folder, 33 photograph folders, 1 folio photograph folder, 1 folio+ photograph folder)

The Mary Elisabeth Dreier papers arrived at the Schlesinger Library in no particular order. Mary Elisabeth Dreier had attempted to sort them while partly blind and they had subsequently been repacked. They have been divided into three series, each arranged chronologically except where noted. There are some professional papers, but most of the collection consists of correspondence with family members and friends. Most of the papers date from the 1920s or later. Additional material (accession number 2007-M43) was added to the collection in August 2016. This material is located in Series IV (#309-352).

SERIES I, PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL PAPERS, 1797-1963 (#1-178), includes day books, which give some indication of Mary Elisabeth Dreier's daily activities; however, except for a short run in the 1950s, they exist for only random years, and she did not write every day. Most of the poetry in #14-18 was occasional, written for various holidays or addressed to relatives or friends; the poems in #17 are addressed to KFC, the initials of a nickname of Raymond Robins. Mary Elisabeth Dreier's financial records are fairly complete. They include information on taxes and investments, people Mary Elisabeth Dreier helped support, and organizations to which she regularly contributed. The New York Women's Trade Union League material contains very little from Mary Elisabeth Dreier's early years or the years of her presidency with the League. There is almost no information about the 1909 shirtwaist makers' strike which Mary Elisabeth Dreier led and during which she was arrested. There are several personal accounts of work and living conditions by women who worked in the garment industry (see #45). The correspondence with executive secretary Elisabeth Christman provides a good picture of the League's last 15 years, when it was beset with the financial problems that finally forced it to dissolve. The professional materials (#71-76) also contain little information about Mary Elisabeth Dreier's most active years. The correspondence between Frances Kellor and Mary Elisabeth Dreier spans the length of their fifty-year relationship. The letters document the close and affectionate nature of their friendship; there is some discussion of their work, especially in the early years. The major portion of this series consists of correspondence, arranged alphabetically. Mary Elisabeth Dreier often established personal friendships with people she worked with, and so there has been no attempt to distinguish personal and professional correspondence. Most of the letters are to Mary Elisabeth Dreier; the occasional letter from Mary Elisabeth Dreier is interfiled with the appropriate correspondent. Major correspondents have their own folders; these are followed by general alphabetical folders.

SERIES II, DREIER FAMILY PAPERS, 1813-1963 (#179-283), contains papers of various members of the family, mainly their correspondence with Mary Elisabeth Dreier and with others. Many of the early Dreier letters (pre-1900) are in German, as is Mary Elisabeth Dreier's correspondence with German relatives. Most of the letters in this series are to Mary Elisabeth Dreier from her family; letters from Mary Elisabeth Dreier are interfiled with those from the appropriate correspondent. Mary Elisabeth Dreier's correspondence with Margaret Dreier Robins reveals a close and loving relationship between the two sisters. There is little discussion of the New York Women's Trade Union League or of other professional interests; most of the letters deal with family matters and mutual friends. Later letters illustrate Margaret Dreier Robins's increasing dependence on Mary Elisabeth Dreier as the health of Margaret Dreier Robins and Raymond Robins began to fail. Mary Elisabeth Dreier also maintained a long and deeply affectionate correspondence with her brother-in-law Raymond Robins. They created the "Order of the Flaming Cross"; she calls him "Knight of the Flaming Cross" (KFC) and he calls her "Lady of the Flaming Cross" (LFC). The Raymond Robins papers contain numerous clippings about his disappearance in the 1930s (at first attributed to kidnaping, but in fact due to amnesia). There is also a folder of correspondence between Mary Elisabeth Dreier and Raymond Robins's sister, Elisabeth Robins, an actress and writer who for many years made her home in England. Mary Elisabeth Dreier's correspondence with Lisa von Borowsky deals mainly with the activities of the Robinses, their health problems after Raymond Robins was paralyzed in an accident in the 1930s, and the care of the estate after Raymond Robins died. Correspondence with both Raymond Robins and Lisa von Borowsky also refers to the establishment of Chinsegut Hill as a nature reserve.

Some of the letters between Mary Elisabeth Dreier and Henry Edward Dreier or Theodore Dreier and Mary Elisabeth Dreier discuss Mary Elisabeth Dreier's and other family financial matters, including the purchase and sale of stocks and bonds and their increase and decline in value over time. Discussion of national and world politics, particularly regarding United States president politics and World War II, is scattered throughout correspondence with her brother Henry Edward Dreier and his wife, her sister Margaret Dreier Robins and her husband, and her sister Katherine Sophie Dreier, but most of the correspondence is devoted to an exchange of family news. (See also correspondence with nephew Peter Voorhees (#32 and 33) and Series IV for additional correspondence with Katherine Sophie Dreier.) Other correspondence with Katherine Sophie Dreier (mostly incoming) documents her sister's work with the art organization Société Anonyme (of which her sister was a founder) and her friendships with various artists, including Marcel Duchamp. Correspondence with nephew Theodore Dreier and his wife document his time as a student at Harvard University and the founding of the experimental school Black Mountain College (to which Mary Elisabeth Dreier provided financial support), founded by Theodore Dreier, John Andrew Rice, Frederick Georgia, and Ralph Lounsbury in 1933 after their departure from Rollins College. Mary Elisabeth Dreier faithfully corresponded with her siblings and in-laws and their children and grandchildren until she died, and the letters reveal the interest of a loving sister and doting aunt. The long run of correspondence between Katherine Sophie Dreier and Mary Elisabeth Dreier again illustrate the concern and affection Mary Elisabeth Dreier felt for her family. Katherine Sophie Dreier was especially close to Mary Elisabeth Dreier; her letters report fully on her work and political attitudes (with particular focus on United States politics and pre- and post-World War II politics in Europe), with occasional references to family tensions. Other topics discussed in Katherine Sophie Dreier's letters include her friendships with various artists, including Marcel Duchamp, and her work with the Société Anonyme, founded by Katherine Sophie Dreier and others. Many of the letters discuss spiritualism and Katherine Sophie Dreier's efforts to examine its effects on her day-to-day life.

SERIES III, PHOTOGRAPHS, ca.1854-1968, n.d. (#284-304), includes photographs of Mary Elisabeth Dreier, her family, and her friends. Very few of the pictures are dated, and some are not identified. Of particular interest is the photograph of Mary Elisabeth Dreier's grandfather Heinrich Eduard Dreier (#301) and of Mary Elisabeth Dreier's parents with two of their children and several other relatives in the same folder. The arrangement of this series parallels that of Series I and II. Most of the photographs in this collection are or will be cataloged in VIA, Harvard University's Visual Information Access database.

SERIES IV, ADDENDA, ca.1880-1965 (#309-352), includes address books, biographical material, correspondence, photographs, guest books, writings, etc. Biographical material consists of a small number of clippings and related material regarding Mary Elisabeth Dreier, a short biography of Leonora O'Reilly, suffragist and trade union reformer and a friend of Dreier, and a biography of her sister Margaret Dreier Robbins. Most of the correspondence is personal in nature, and most is with her sister, artist Katherine Sophie Dreier, and her nephew Theodore Dreier. Correspondence with Katherine Sophie Dreier is mostly outgoing but does document her sister's work with the art organization Société Anonyme (of which her sister was a founder), her friendships with various artists, including Marcel Duchamp, as well as Mary Dreier's work with the Women's Trade Union League and for women's suffrage (see Series II, Subseries D, for additional correspondence). Correspondence with her nephew Theodore Dreier relates to family news, his time as a student at Harvard University, and his work at the experimental Black Mountain College in North Carolina, to which his aunt was a frequent donor and of which he was a founder. Other correspondence is between Theodore Dreier and a number of friends and organizations to whom Mary Elisabeth Dreier had left bequests in her will. Over the two years following her death in 1963, Theodore Dreier contacted beneficiaries (family members, friends, and organizations) of her will to distribute funds as requested. Also included in this series are two guest books from her summer home, Valour House, at Fernald Point in Maine, filled with messages from and photographs of the many friends and family members that she entertained there over the years, including Eleanor and Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Very little material in this series documents Dreier's professional life with the exception of several photographs of a suffrage parade, members of the Women's Trade Union League, and conditions in the factory at the Recording and Computing Machines Company, and an interview transcript regarding her time with the New York State Factory Investigating Commission (1911-1915). Other photographs are of Mary Elisabeth Dreier at various stages of her life, with friends and family, and of her German ancestors. Original folder titles were retained. This series is arranged alphabetically. It represents accession number 2007-M43 and was added to the collection in August 2016.

BIOGRAPHY

Mary Elisabeth Dreier (also known as Mimi, Mietze, and Tolochee), social reformer, was born in Brooklyn, New York, on September 26, 1875, the fourth of five surviving children of Theodor Dreier and Dorothea Adelheid (Dreier) Dreier. Theodor Dreier emigrated to the United States from Bremen, Germany, in 1849; he settled in New York City, where he eventually became a partner in the local branch of Naylor, Benson and Co., an English iron firm. In 1864 he returned to Germany for a visit and married a younger cousin, Dorothea. They had five children: Margaret Dreier (1868-1945), Dorothea Adelheid (1870-1923), Henry Edward (1872-1955), Mary, and Katherine Sophie (1877-1952).

Dreier attended George Brackett's school in Brooklyn. She took classes at the New York School of Philanthropy but did not seek a college degree. A strong religious background helped motivate Mary Elisabeth Dreier to undertake reform work. In 1899 she met Leonora O'Reilly, a former garment worker who was head of a local settlement house. O'Reilly later brought both Dreier and her sister Margaret into the New York Women's Trade Union League, a coalition of women workers and middle- and upper-class women reformers founded in 1903 to organize working women and educate the public about urban labor conditions.

She served as president of the New York Women's Trade Union League from 1906 to 1914 and remained active in the organization until it disbanded in 1950. She was arrested while demonstrating during the 1909 strike of shirtwaist makers and was henceforth a leading spokeswoman for labor reform on behalf of women workers. She was the only woman on the New York State Factory Investigating Commission, which was appointed after the Triangle Shirtwaist Company fire in 1911. Between 1911 and 1915, Mary Elisabeth Dreier, chairman Robert F. Wagner, vice-chairman Alfred E. Smith, and six other commissioners wrote a report that helped to modernize the state's labor laws.

The negative attitude of male trade unionists towards women workers helped turn Mary Elisabeth Dreier into an ardent supporter of suffrage and women's rights; she chaired the Industrial Section of the New York State Woman Suffrage Party. On the national level Dreier often supported Progressive Party nominees, including Robert M. LaFollette and Henry A. Wallace, although like many progressives she was an enthusiastic backer of Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal.

She served on a number of government and private committees concerned with labor and women. Later in life, however, she focused more of her attention on international issues and American foreign policy. Between the two world wars she was a supporter of Soviet-American friendship and an outspoken opponent of the regime in Nazi Germany; after World War II she opposed nuclear proliferation. She was investigated by the FBI in the 1950s.

Dreier wrote numerous poems, plays, and skits during her long life. In 1914 she wrote Barbara Richards, a novel about working women that was never published. In 1950 she published a laudatory biography of her sister, Margaret Dreier Robins: Her Life, Letters and Work.

Her income came from a trust fund left by her father; she was a generous supporter of causes, the Women's Trade Union League, numerous friends, and family members. She remained close to her brother and sisters, and to her brother's children and grandchildren, and kept up a long correspondence with relatives in Germany. She never married, but shared a home with fellow reformer Frances Kellor from 1905 until the latter's death in 1952. Thereafter she lived alone, still a busy correspondent and active in favorite causes despite increasingly frail health. She spent a good deal of time at her sister's (Margaret Dreier Robbins) home at Chinsegut Hill outside Brooksville, Florida, and at her summer home, Valour House, at Fernald Point in Maine. She died of a pulmonary embolism on August 15, 1963, at her summer home at Bar Harbor, Maine, at the age of 87.

For further biographical information about Mary Elisabeth Dreier, see Notable American Women, Vol. IV. The papers of the National Women's Trade Union League are available on microfilm at the Schlesinger Library.
DREIER FAMILY HISTORY Margaret Dreier Robins (September 6, 1868-February 21, 1945), also known as Gretchen and Bimini, was the oldest of Theodor and Dorothea Dreier's five children. She began to work for various social organizations in New York in her late teens, and in 1904 joined the New York Women's Trade Union League. The following year she married fellow reformer Raymond Robins (1873-1954; also known as Ahochee) and moved to Chicago, where she continued to work for the League and became its president (1907-1922). In 1924, Margaret Dreier Robins and Raymond Robins retired to Chinsegut Hill, their 2000-acre estate in Florida. Mary Elisabeth Dreier spent much time at Chinsegut Hill; she was very close to both Margaret Dreier Robins and Raymond Robins. Margaret Dreier Robins died at Chinsegut Hill of pernicious anemia and a heart ailment at the age of 76; Dreier continued to visit the state often until 1954, when the invalided Raymond Robins died. The Robinses had no children but for many years shared their home with Lisa von Borowsky, who remained at Chinsegut Hill after the Robinses' death to care for the estate.

The papers of Margaret Dreier Robins are at the University of Florida Library in Gainesville. For further biographical information about Margaret Dreier Robins, see Notable American Women, Vol. I, and Margaret Dreier Robins: Her Life, Letters and Work by Mary Elisabeth Dreier (1950). The papers of Raymond Robins are at the State Historical Society of Wisconsin at Madison.

Dorothea Adelheid Dreier (1870-1923), also known as Dodo, was the second daughter and a painter. She studied art for several years in Europe but never gained the prominence of her younger sister Katherine (see below). The papers of Dorothea Dreier are at the Archives of American Art of the Smithsonian Institution and are available at the Archives of American Art in Washington, New York, Boston, Detroit, and San Francisco.

Henry Edward Dreier (1872-1955), known as Edward, was a New York businessman. He worked for his father's company for many years and eventually became its president. He was also president of the Lock Stub Company. In 1901, Henry Edward Dreier married Ethel Eyre Valentine (1874-1958), a suffragist who was later active with the League of Women Voters and in civic affairs (her papers are the Sophia Smith Collection at Smith College). The couple had four children: Theodore, who married Barbara Loines and had three children: Theodore (Ted V, Quintus, Eddie), Mark, and Barbara; John, who married Louisa (Isa) Richardson and had three children: John (Jock), Susan, and Alexander; Dorothea, who married Peter Voorhees, and had two children: Dorothea and Peter; and Nan, who married Garrett Stearley.

Katherine Sophie Dreier (September 10, 1877-March 29, 1952), also known as Kate, was a patron of modern art as well as an artist. She studied art in New York as a youth and in Europe as an adult. In 1914, she helped establish the Cooperative Mural Workshop, and in 1916 joined the newly formed, avant-garde Society of Independent Artists. She made her most lasting contribution to modern art when she joined with Marcel Duchamp and Man Ray to found the Société Anonyme, a "center for the study and promotion of modern art." As an artist, Katherine Sophie Dreier was known for a predominantly abstract style. Katherine Sophie Dreier maintained a deeply affectionate relationship with her sister Mary, with whom she shared a life-long interest in spiritualism. The Katherine Sophie Dreier papers are available at Beinecke Library, Yale University. Most of them deal with the Société Anonyme. For further biographical information, see Notable American Women, Vol. IV.

ARRANGEMENT

The collection is arranged in four series:
  1. Series I. Personal and professional papers, 1797-1963 (#1-178)
  2. Series II. Dreier family papers, 1813-1963 (#179-283)
  3. Series III. Photographs and oversized, ca.1854-1968, n.d. (#284-304)
  4. Series IV. Addenda, ca.1880-1965 (#309-352)

Immediate Source of Acquisition

Accession number: 77-M210. Accession number 2007-M43 was added to the collection in August 2016.

The papers of Mary Elisabeth Dreier were given to the Schlesinger Library by Theodore Dreier, Mary Elisabeth Dreier's nephew, in December 1977 and March 2007.

CONTAINER LIST

  1. Box 1: 1-10
  2. Box 2: 11-18
  3. Box 3: 19-28a
  4. Box 4: 29-38
  5. Box 5: 39-50
  6. Box 6: 51-67
  7. Box 7: 68-80
  8. Box 8: 81-97
  9. Box 9: 98-111
  10. Box 10: 112-138
  11. Box 11: 139-158
  12. Box 12: 159-168
  13. Box 13: 169-181
  14. Box 14: 182-188
  15. Box 15: 189-197
  16. Box 16: 198-208
  17. Box 17: 209-218
  18. Box 18: 219-226
  19. Box 19: 227-233
  20. Box 20: 234-243
  21. Box 21: 244-252
  22. Box 22: 253-260
  23. Box 23: 261-268
  24. Box 24: 269-280
  25. Box 25: 281-283, 309-316
  26. Box 26: 317-328
  27. Box 27: 329-343
SELECTED CORRESPONDENTS LIST
  1. Abramson, Max - 162
  2. Abramson, Rose - 89, 326
  3. Adams, Frankie - 162
  4. Adelman, Rose - 162
  5. Aldrich, Margaret - 162
  6. Alfred, Helen - 162
  7. Allen, Florence E. - 90, 328
  8. Anderson, Betty - 67, 162
  9. Anderson, Constance W. - 71
  10. Anderson, Ellen C. - 71
  11. Anderson, Mary - 91
  12. Armstrong, Eunice - 92
  13. Arnstein, Leslie - 162
  14. Ashurst, Henry F. - 67
  15. Ayer, Charles F. - 162
  16. Backer, George - 162
  17. Badorf, Billie - 162, 163
  18. Balch, Emily - 93
  19. Barbour, Dorothy - 162
  20. Barnes, Ann - 94, 326
  21. Barnes, Florence - 61, 63, 162
  22. Barnes, Myrtle S. - 162
  23. Baum, Pearl - 95, 326
  24. Beaman, Luella Otis - 162
  25. Beard, Mary K. - 162
  26. Becket, Elise - 162
  27. Beckworth, Louise - 162
  28. Bellanca, Dorothy J. - 59
  29. Biddle, Katherine - 162
  30. Blake, Eugene - 162
  31. Blanchard, Helen - 67
  32. Blanchard, Mary - 162
  33. Blossom, Bertha - 96
  34. Blossom, Fred - 96
  35. Bonfig, Henry - 162
  36. Boss, Charles F. - 162
  37. Bowie, Jean - 162
  38. Boyle, James - 162
  39. Brandeis, Josephine Goldmark - 162
  40. Bromely, Dorothy - 67
  41. Brooks, Barbara - 162
  42. Brooks, Carl - 162
  43. Brown, Jane - 97, 328
  44. Brown, Joseph, III - 162
  45. Brown, Katharine Curtis - 162
  46. Brown, Virginia - 162
  47. Brummenhof, Lilly - 162, 326
  48. Buchwalder, Mildred - 162
  49. Buckley, Oliver E. - 162
  50. Buffington, W. Lee - 162
  51. Burch, Cara - 162
  52. Burgess, Ethel - 162
  53. Burgess, Frederick - 162
  54. Burke, John B. - 162
  55. Burman, Ruth - 162
  56. Bush, Mary L. - 162
  57. Butler, Arthur P. - 162
  58. Buttrick, George - 162
  59. Cabot, Richard Clarke - 98
  60. Campbell, Helen - 163
  61. Carner, Lucy P. - 67, 163
  62. Chaffee, Stewart W. - 72
  63. Chalmers, Allan - 163
  64. Chase, Arthur L. - 163
  65. Childs, Grace - 163
  66. Childs, Richard - 163
  67. Christman, Alma - 163
  68. Christman, Elisabeth - 56, 62-65, 99, 317, 326
  69. Christman, William - 163
  70. Church, William W. - 163
  71. Clark, Lydia - 163
  72. Clarke, Elizabeth - 71, 163
  73. Cockburn, Kathleen - 163, 326
  74. Coffin, Jo - 67, 163
  75. Cohen, Mary - 163
  76. Coit, Eleanor G. - 163
  77. Cole, Anna - 163
  78. Collins, Elizabeth M. - 163
  79. Comer, Chrissie - 163
  80. Commager, Henry Steele - 163
  81. Comstock, Louis K. - 163
  82. Conley, May B. - 163
  83. Coogler, Mary A. - 100
  84. Cook, Harley - 163
  85. Cook, Lois - 163
  86. Cook, Nancy - 101
  87. Cooley, George - 163, 330
  88. Copenhaver, Eleanor - 71
  89. Cothren, Marion B. - 58
  90. Cousins, Norman - 163
  91. Crafts, Hazel - 163
  92. Cranford, Flora - 163
  93. Croft, Arthur - 84, 86
  94. Crowell, Richard - 163
  95. Curlman, James - 163
  96. Curtis, Anna - 102, 326
  97. Davelsberg, Rosie - 164
  98. David, Mollie - 67
  99. Davis, Jerome - 103, 326, 329
  100. Davis, Lionburger - 164
  101. Davis, Mildred - 103, 326
  102. Delaplaine, Meribah - 164
  103. Devol, Edmund - 164
  104. Dewson, Mary - 58, 104
  105. Dickerman, Marion - 105, 326
  106. Dickinson, Robert L. - 164
  107. Dodge, Margaret - 164
  108. Dreier, Dorothea Adelheid - 186, 318
  109. Dreier, Ethel Valentine, 219-234, 318
  110. Dreier, Henry Edward, 219-234, 318
  111. Dreier, John - 84, 246-248, 318
  112. Dreier, Katherine Sophie - 251-270, 319-323
  113. Dreier, Theodore - 37, 84, 238-241, 318, 324, 325
  114. Duchamp, Marcel - 84, 106, 207, 326
  115. Duncan, Elizabeth - 164
  116. Dyer, Marguerite - 164
  117. Eaton, Cyrus - 164
  118. Eddy, Sherwood - 56, 164
  119. Eichenberg, Hedwig L. - 164
  120. Eisenhower, Dwight David - 161
  121. Elliot, Laura - 164
  122. Emerson, Thomas - 164, 327
  123. Engelman, Bessie - 164, 327
  124. Fairburn, Laura H. - 71
  125. Farmer, Fyke - 164
  126. Farrar, John - 164
  127. Fast, Howard - 164
  128. Fernald, Helen - 164
  129. Fillman, Elizabeth M. - 72
  130. Fincke, Martha - 164
  131. Fisher, Welthy - 107, 327
  132. Fitzpatrick, Paul - 164
  133. Fleddius, May L. - 164
  134. Flexner, Eleanor - 164
  135. Flynn, Elizabeth Gurley - 108
  136. Foliushen, Ruth B. - 164
  137. Foote, Eleanor - 164
  138. Frame, Sarah - 109, 327
  139. Frankfurter, Felix - 161
  140. Franklin, Stella Miles - 164
  141. Freedman, Blanch - 67
  142. Fried, Rose - 164
  143. Fry, Elizabeth - 164
  144. Fuchs, Marie - 34, 327
  145. Gawthorpe, Mary - 110, 328
  146. Gibson, Henrietta - 71
  147. Gilbert, Charles K. - 164
  148. Gilson, Mary B. - 164
  149. Goff, Florence - 67
  150. Goff, Mary - 67
  151. Goodwin, Molly - 164
  152. Gompers, Samuel L. - 67
  153. Gore, David Ormsby - 164
  154. Goulding, Louise F. - 164
  155. Graham, Frank - 164
  156. Green, John M. - 164
  157. Green, William - 164
  158. Hackuty, Jossie - 165
  159. Hagedorn, Herman - 165
  160. Hall, Stacia - 71
  161. Hamilton, George - 165
  162. Hanks, Anne F. - 165
  163. Hansen, Frieda - 165, 327
  164. Hansen, Pauline - 71
  165. Harper, Elsie D. - 71, 165
  166. Harris, Margaret - 165
  167. Hatvany, Antonia - 85, 86, 165, 327
  168. Healy, Anne - 165
  169. Healy, Florence - 165
  170. Hekking, William - 165
  171. Henry, Alice - 165
  172. Herrick, Elinor Morehouse - 112
  173. Heyward, Virginia E. - 165
  174. Hickson, Barbara - 165
  175. Hill, Dorothy - 111, 327
  176. Hillman, Bessie - 165
  177. Holbrook, Alma - 165
  178. Homos, Helen - 165
  179. Hopkins, Edna - 165
  180. Hopkins, Ernest - 165
  181. Houghton, Roy M. - 165
  182. Howe, Quincy - 165
  183. Howell, Lillian M. - 165
  184. Hubbard, Laura - 165
  185. Hughes, Charles Evans - 161
  186. Humphrey, Hubert H. - 160
  187. Hurst, Fannie - 165
  188. Hutchins, Grace - 165
  189. Ickes, Harold - 84, 113
  190. Ickes, Jane - 113
  191. Ingersoll, Marion C. - 166
  192. Ives, Irving M. - 160
  193. Ivimey, Mea Arthurettta - 166
  194. Jacobs, Sophia Yarnall - 166
  195. James, Dorothea - 166
  196. Javits, Jacob - 160
  197. Johnson, F. Ernest - 56, 166
  198. Johnson, John - 166
  199. Johnson, Lyndon Baines - 161
  200. Kaye, Bess W. - 67
  201. Keating, Kenneth - 160
  202. Keller, Helen - 166
  203. Kellogg, Paul - 166
  204. Kellor, Frances - 77-83, 87, 330
  205. Kelly, Albert C. - 166
  206. Kennedy, John Fitzgerald - 161, 330
  207. Kenyon, Dorothy - 166
  208. Kingsbury, John - 114
  209. Kingsbury, Mabel - 114
  210. Kirchwey, Freda - 166
  211. Kirk, Mary - 166
  212. Klueg, Grace Buster - 67, 166
  213. Koch, Kaste - 166
  214. Kohut, Rebekah - 166
  215. Koten, Bernard L. - 72, 166
  216. Kuchler, Josephine - 166
  217. Kunitz, Joshua - 166
  218. La Guardia, Fiorello - 115
  219. Laidlaw, Harriet B. - 63
  220. Lamont, Corliss - 72, 116
  221. Lamont, Margaret - 116
  222. Lampe, Ernest - 167
  223. Larrabee, Margaret - 167
  224. Larsen, John - 117
  225. Lawrence, Ruth E. - 167
  226. Leach, Thelma - 167
  227. Lebowitz, Hilda - 167
  228. Lehman, Herbert H. 118
  229. Lerner, Marx - 167
  230. Leslie, Kenneth - 119
  231. Leslie, Mabel - 167
  232. Levinson, Salmon O. - 167
  233. Lewis, William Draper - 167
  234. Litchfield, Marion - 167
  235. Lord, Clifford L. - 167
  236. Lowse, Anne - 167
  237. Lubin, Isador - 67
  238. Macarthur, Mary P. - 168
  239. McClanahan, Richard - 168
  240. McCormick, Ada P. - 168
  241. McCulloch, Rhoda E. - 168
  242. McKinney, Tressie - 71
  243. Mackintosh, Alexander - 168
  244. MacLay, Emily - 168
  245. McNally, Mary - 168
  246. Macnie, John P. - 168
  247. McWilliams, Carey - 120
  248. Maher, Amy G. - 67, 168
  249. Malatzky, Jennie - 54
  250. Marsha, Geneva M. - 168
  251. Meed, Emily - 168
  252. Melish, William Howard - 168
  253. Mellen, Anne - 121
  254. Merburger, Anne Vincent - 168
  255. Miller, Frieda Segelke - 122
  256. Mishnun, Eleanor - 123, 328
  257. Molzahn, John - 168
  258. Moor, Elizabeth - 73
  259. Morford, Richard - 124, 328
  260. Morgan, Edward - 168
  261. Morgenthau, Henry - 58, 84, 125
  262. Morgenthau, Rita - 125, 328
  263. Morris, Newbold - 168
  264. Morse, Elsa - 168
  265. Morse, Reba - 168
  266. Mosser, Marjorie - 168
  267. Mott, Agnes - 168
  268. Movai, Helen - 168
  269. Mudge, Marjorie - 168
  270. Mumford, Lewis - 168
  271. Munsell, Alex - 72
  272. Murray, George - 168
  273. Murray, Peggy - 168
  274. Murrow, Edward R. - 168
  275. Neal, Helen - 126,
  276. Nearing, Scott - 168
  277. Nelson, Laura - 168
  278. Nestor, Agnes - 67
  279. Newman, Pauline - 127, 328
  280. Nobis, Mildred D. - 168
  281. Nugent, Julie - 168
  282. O'Brien, Agnes - 128
  283. O'Day, Caroline - 129
  284. O'Dwyer, William - 169
  285. O'Gorman, Alice - 130
  286. Olcott, Kay - 169
  287. Oppenheim, Ida - 169, 328
  288. Ortmayer, Marie - 169
  289. Papert, Kate - 169
  290. Paret, Bertha - 131
  291. Paret, Thomas - 131
  292. Parry, Mary - 169
  293. Pauling, Ava - 132
  294. Pauling, Linus - 132
  295. Peaks, Mary B. - 169
  296. Peck, Mary - 169
  297. Pepper, Claude - 160
  298. Pergament, Marie - 169
  299. Perkins, Frances - 67, 133, 328
  300. Perkins, Palfrey - 84, 169
  301. Perutz, Helen - 134
  302. Peterson, Alma - 135
  303. Phillips, Marion - 67
  304. Pickett, Margaret - 71
  305. Pigors, Faith - 169
  306. Piores, Nora - 169
  307. Polevoi, Boris - 169
  308. Polier, Justine Wise - 158
  309. Poling, Daniel - 169
  310. Post, Alice Thacher - 136
  311. Pratt, Caroline - 169
  312. Puretz, Henry - 169
  313. Read, David - 137
  314. Reed, Stayman - 170
  315. Regan, Julia - 170
  316. Reid, Helen - 138
  317. Reid, Ruth Barrett - 170
  318. Reid, William - 170
  319. Reisch, Sadi - 170
  320. Resis, Albert - 170
  321. Reston, James - 170
  322. Reuther, Walter P. - 170
  323. Reynolds, Ruth M. - 170
  324. Ridder, Victor F. - 170
  325. Roberts, Holland - 139
  326. Robins, Elizabeth - 210
  327. Robins, Margaret Dreier - 187-197, 318
  328. Robins, Raymond - 202-205
  329. Roche, Josephine - 140
  330. Rockefeller, Nelson A. - 161
  331. Roosevelt, Anna Eleanor - 59, 141, 330
  332. Roosevelt, Franklin Delano - 142
  333. Roosevelt, Theodore - 143
  334. Rose, Ada - 67
  335. Rosenberg, Anna Marie - 170
  336. Rubin, Lou - 170
  337. Rumsey, Susan - 170
  338. Ryan, Mary - 170
  339. Saarinen, Aline - 144
  340. Saloman, Alice - 145
  341. Sanders, John, Jr. - 110
  342. Sanders, Mary Gawthorpe - 110, 328
  343. Santer, Bill - 172
  344. Sater, Chet - 171
  345. Sater, Helen - 171
  346. Sauter, William - 171
  347. Scandrett, Alexander M. - 171
  348. Scandrett, Mary - 172
  349. Schain, Josephine - 56
  350. Schiff, Dorothy - 172
  351. Schneiderman, Rose - 66, 146, 328
  352. Schulter, Charlotte - 172
  353. Scott, Melinda - 171
  354. Seligman, Edwin R. A. - 172
  355. Sever, Edward - 172
  356. Shaw, Bradford - 171
  357. Shawn, Ted - 147
  358. Shientag, Bernard - 171
  359. Shientag, Florence P. - 171
  360. Shute, Frank - 171
  361. Simon, Abbott - 171
  362. Skeel, Emily - 67
  363. Smith, Alfred E. - 161, 330
  364. Smith, Helen - 67, 71
  365. Smith, Hilda Worthington - 148
  366. Smith, Jane - 172, 328
  367. Smith, Jessica - 73, 149
  368. Sorenson, Louise - 171
  369. Spies, Allie - 171
  370. Spurling, Edna M. - 171
  371. Squier, Ethel - 171
  372. Staulley, Mary - 172
  373. Stearley, Garrett - 249, 250, 328
  374. Stearly, Nan Dreier - 249, 250
  375. Steeger, Henry - 171
  376. Steiger, Andrew - 171
  377. Steiger, Shura - 171
  378. Stein, Gertrude - 172
  379. Stevenson, Adlai - 161
  380. Stone, Margaret F. - 67, 171, 172
  381. Stretcher, Jane - 172
  382. Strong, Anna Louise - 150
  383. Sullivan, Olive - 171
  384. Swanson, Natalie - 171
  385. Swartz, Maud - 172
  386. Swartz, Nelle - 172
  387. Swing, Raymond Gram - 171
  388. Switzer, Mary - 151
  389. Taber, Carlotta - 172
  390. Taber, Gladys W. - 71
  391. Timberton, Alice - 172
  392. Tousy, Elizabeth - 67, 172
  393. Truman, Harry S. - 161
  394. Tyndale, Elsie H. - 72
  395. Untermeyer, Eugene - 67
  396. Van Cott, Evelyn - 173
  397. Van Cott, Joshua - 173
  398. Van Horn, Olive - 173
  399. Van Kirk, Walter - 173
  400. Van Kleeck, Mary - 152
  401. Van Loon, Hendrik Willem - 173
  402. Van Vliet, Maria W. - 173
  403. Vincent, Anne - 173
  404. Von Borowsky, Lisa - 211-218
  405. Von Jastrow, Bertha - 173
  406. Voorhees, Dorothea Dreier - 246, 247, 318, 328
  407. Voorhees, Peter - 32, 33, 246, 247
  408. Wagner, Robert F. - 160
  409. Wald, Lillian - 58, 153
  410. Walklet, Peggy - 173
  411. Warburg, Frieda - 173
  412. Warburg, James P. - 173
  413. Warburg, Wilma S. - 71
  414. Ward, Harry - 154
  415. Ward, Muriel - 154
  416. Weill, Blanche C. - 173
  417. Weiss, Louise - 173
  418. Wells, Mary H. - 173
  419. Wessel, Sophie - 155, 328
  420. West, Stanley - 173
  421. White, Caroline - 173
  422. White, Montague - 173
  423. White, William Allen - 173
  424. Whittier, Robert - 173
  425. Wilde, Margaret - 71
  426. Williams, Albert Rhys - 156, 157, 328
  427. Williams, Alfred - 173
  428. Williams, Frances - 173
  429. Williams, Lucita Squier - 156, 157, 328
  430. Willig, Berta - 173
  431. Wilson, Gail - 173
  432. Wilson, Ruth - 67
  433. Wise, Stephen - 158
  434. Wiseman, Ida - 56
  435. Wolfe, James P. - 173
  436. Wolfers, Arnold - 173
  437. Worcester, Dorothy - 173
  438. Wright, Evelyn - 173
  439. Yourdis, Freda - 67
  440. Young, Edward - 159
  441. Young, Murray - 173

Processing Information

Processed: October 1980

By: Donna Webber

Updated and additional material added: August 2016

By: Mark Vassar
Link to catalog
Title
Dreier, Mary E. (Mary Elisabeth), 1875-1963. Papers of Mary E. (Elisabeth) Dreier, 1797-1968 (inclusive), 1897-1968 (bulk): A Finding Aid
Author
Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America
Sponsor
Processing of this collection was made possible by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (RC-0051-79-1260)
EAD ID
sch00136

Repository Details

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