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COLLECTION Identifier: A-170

Papers of the Nichols-Shurtleff family, 1780-1953 (inclusive), 1850-1940 (bulk)

Correspondence and diaries of the Nichols and Shurtleff families from New England.

Dates

  • 1780-1953
  • Majority of material found within 1850-1940

Language of Materials

Materials in English.

Access Restrictions:

Access. Collection is open for research.

Conditions Governing Use

Copyright. Copyright in the papers created by the Nichols-Shurtleff family is held by the President and Fellows of Harvard College for the Schlesinger Library. Copyright in other papers in the collection may be held by their authors, or the authors' heirs or assigns.

Copying. Papers may be copied in accordance with the library's usual procedures.

Extent

7.72 linear feet (17 file boxes, 3 half file boxes)

The bulk of this collection consists of the papers of the Nichols family: Dr. Arthur Howard Nichols (1840-1923), Elizabeth Fisher (Homer) Nichols (1844-1929), and their three children, Rose Standish Nichols (1872-1960), Marian Clarke Nichols (1873-1953), and Margaret Homer (Nichols) Shurtleff (1879-1959). The remainder relates to the Shurtleff family, particularly to Sarah Ann (Keegan) Shurtleff, the mother-in-law of Margaret Nichols Shurtleff.

The first series consists largely of family correspondence about both the individual activities and thoughts, and the family life, of Arthur and Elizabeth Nichols and their daughters. The interests of the parents are most fully represented by the letters they wrote each other, mainly about such domestic concerns as household help, redecorating and renovating, and family finances. Much of their correspondence also provides information about business ventures, social activities, family news, and trips abroad. The papers of the daughters document their social activities, travels, and their individual pursuits: Rose's interest in landscape architecture, Marian's involvement in philanthropic and civic organizations, and Margaret's role as the mother of six children and an activist for the cause of world peace. The Nichols family papers also contain much correspondence with other relatives, including the sculptor Augustus St. Gaudens, husband of Elizabeth's sister Augusta, and with friends and business associates.

N.B. The Emerson-Nichols Papers, MC 212, contains considerable material by and about Marian Clarke Nichols, the St. Gaudens', the Emersons, and other Nichols family relatives.

The second series, the Keegan and Shurtleff Families, consists mainly of diaries of Sarah Ann (Keegan) Shurtleff. In addition there are papers by and about her parents and siblings; numerous hand-bound volumes of poetry and drawings by Gertrude Hope Shurtleff, Sarah Ann (Keegan) Shurtleff's daughter; and scattered information about Sarah Ann (Keegan) Shurtleff's husband, Asahel Milton Shurtleff, and their four sons, one of whom was Arthur Asahel Shurtleff, Margaret Nichols Shurtleff's husband.

Most of Sarah Ann (Keegan) Shurtleff's diaries are records of trips she took with her husband, providing detailed accounts of the places they visited, with background information she had acquired and her own thoughts and impressions. She later transcribed the contents of these diaries into bound volumes, illustrated with pictures she had collected and photographs taken by her husband; these volumes she gave to her husband and children. This collection includes some original diaries, some illustrated volumes, and, for some journeys, both.

See also Lively Days: Some Memoirs of Margaret Homer Shurcliff call number: 973.78 S56

The first two series are organized by individual, beginning with the oldest family member; in addition to correspondence and diaries, they contain pamphlets, business papers, articles and speeches, and newsclippings. Series III consists of photographs of family members and vacation sites.

BIOGRAPHY

Arthur A. Shurtleff, son of Asahel M. Shurtleff and Sarah A. (Keegan) Shurtleff, was born in Boston on September 19, 1870. He was home-schooled until 10 years of age when he entered the Prince Grammar School, later attending the Boston Latin School and the English High School. He attended the Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 1889 to 1894, receiving an SB in mechanical engineering. He entered Harvard University in 1894, receiving a BS in general science in 1896. From 1896 until 1905 he worked for Olmsted, Olmsted, and Eliot, a landscape design office founded by Frederick Law Olmsted. In 1905 he married Margaret Homer Nichols. In the same year he opened his own landscape office hiring Raymond Aldrich and H.E. Millard as assistants. He assisted Frederick Law Olmsted in creating the landscape architecture program at Harvard University and taught in the program with Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr., from 1899 to 1908, dividing his time between teaching and his private practice. He resigned from teaching in 1908 in order to dedicate his time to his private practice (his son Sidney later join the practice). While in private practice he assisted in the development of Old Sturbridge Village and Colonial Williamsburg; designed campuses for a number of schools and colleges including Amherst and Mount Holyoke Colleges, and Brown, Tufts, and Colgate universities; designed the Storrow Memorial Embankment (Boston, 1930) and was responsible for its redesign in 1946 when Storrow Drive was built; and completed plans for 27 cities and towns in New England, Texas, and Indiana. In addition to publishing a number of reports, etc., regarding landscape architecture, Shurtleff published several books of essays, including New England Journal, Second New England Journal, and A Man Walks the Earth. He died at his home in Boston in 1957.

Margaret Homer (Nichols) Shurtleff, daughter of Arthur H. Nichols (a Harvard-trained physician) and Elizabeth F. (Homer) Nichols, was born in Boston on October 30, 1879. As a child she attended Mrs. Shaw’s school on Marlborough Street in Boston, a co-educational private school teaching "the three Rs" as well as inventional geometry and carpentry to all students. At thirteen she entered Miss Folsom’s School for Girls in Boston. The Nichols family summered at Rye Beach, NH, until 1889 when they spent a summer at the home of Margaret's aunt, Augusta St. Gaudens, wife of the famous sculptor, in Cornish, New Hampshire. The family bought a summer home in Cornish the following year. She married Arthur A. Shurtleff in 1905. The couple had six children: Sidney N. Shurtleff, William A. Shurtleff, John P. Shurtleff, Alice W. Shurtleff, Sarah (Shurtleff) Ingelfinger, and Elizabeth (Shurtleff) Lowell. In 1930 the family legally changed the spelling of their surname from Shurtleff to Shurcliff to more closely coincide with the ancient spelling of the family name. They resided at several homes on Mount Vernon Street in Boston (mainly at 66 Mount Vernon Street) and summered at their family home in Ipswich, Massachusetts. Following in her father’s footsteps Margaret became an avid change ringer on church bells in England and the United States and often performed at a number of local churches and gave concerts at Castle Hill, and was the founder and first president of the American Guild of English Handbell Ringers (now Handbell Musicians of America). As a result of her carpentry classes taken as a child (and later at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology), she taught local children carpentry and also made pine furniture for sale, later opening the shop Pegleggers on Charles Street in Boston with several other women and, later, a shop in her home. She was a founding member of the Massachusetts Civil Liberties Union, holding several early meetings in her home on Beacon Hill, attending legislative sessions, and giving testimony regarding labor legislation and local labor strikes, as well as attending the Sacco and Vanzetti trial in 1920 and once visiting Nicola Sacco in prison. She continued her civil liberties work throughout her lifetime and contributed to her community in a number of ways, acting as a member of the Examining Committee of the Boston Public Library (ca.1945), raising money for the Community Fund, spotting aircraft for the anti-aircraft service during World War II, and entertaining hospitalized sailors. She died in 1959.

Alice Warburton Shurcliff, the youngest daughter of Arthur A. and Margaret (Nichols) Shurtleff, was born in 1915. She attended Bryn Mawr College, graduating in 1938, and received an MS from the New York School of Social Work, Columbia University. During World War II, she was employed by the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration (UNRRA), an international relief agency, largely dominated by the United States but representing 44 nations. Founded in 1943, it became part of the United Nations in 1945, was especially active in 1945 and 1946, largely shutting down operations in 1947. Its purpose was to "plan, co-ordinate, administer or arrange for the administration of measures for the relief of victims of war in any area under the control of any of the United Nations through the provision of food, fuel, clothing, shelter and other basic necessities, medical and other essential services.” Although initially restricted by its constitution to render aid only to nationals from the United Nations (the Allies), this was changed late in 1944, in response to pleas from Jewish organizations who were concerned with the fate of surviving Jews of German nationality, to also include "other persons who have been obliged to leave their country or place of origin or former residence or who have been deported therefrom by action of the enemy because of race, religion or activities in favor of the United Nations." While employed by UNRRA she spent her time in Greece and Egypt.

During the Allied occupation of Japan following World War II, Shurcliff served as a labor analyst under the Supreme Command Allied Powers (SCAP) as part of the labor division. As a civil servant, Shurcliff worked to investigate practices in Japanese zaibatsu, family controlled corporations closely linked to one another, that had been loyal to the Emperor and provided the economic engine for Japan’s war effort. Facilities for the production of arms and munitions were to be eliminated, while economic activities that would contribute to a democratically oriented Japan were to be encouraged. SCAP’s de-concentration campaign was to include provisions to encourage policies to permit widespread ownership of the means of production and trade and to reorganize Japanese business by dissolving large banking and industrial corporations. In addition, laws allowing labor unions and removing employment controls were to be adopted by the new Japanese government as soon as possible.

In 1950 she began working with the United States Labor Department and, in 1957 received a Rockefeller Public Service Award to study labor conditions in Southeast Asia, visiting the countries of Indonesia, Burma (now Myanmar), Thailand, Singapore, Malaya (now Malaysia), Vietnam, and India. During this trip she viewed factories and plantations and met with representatives of management and labor unions, also viewing worker housing, vocational training centers, union headquarters, clinics for workers, etc. Her funding also allowed her to hire anthropologist Jane Philips to accompany her gathering information about attitudes towards work and culture patterns, both local and Western, which resulted in misunderstandings. In 1967 she published Economic Development in the Eastern Caribbean Islands: St. Kitts, Nevis, Anguilla. She died June 23, 2000, and is buried in Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Additional family members include Helen Shurtleff (1877-1968), Ernest Warburton Shurtleff (1862-1918) (husband and wife), and their daughter Gertrude S. Shurtleff. During World War I, Helen and Ernest Shurtleff, a minister, worked extensively with war refugees in France (many of whom were blind), dispensing food, supplies, and medical care.

ARRANGEMENT

The collection is arranged in three series:
  1. Series I. NICHOLS FAMILY
  2. Series II. KEEGAN AND SHURTLEFF FAMILIES
  3. Series III. PHOTOGRAPHS

Immediate Source of Acquisition

Accession numbers: 1000, 1136, 1433, 1446, 1483, 1548, 1615, 69-21, 69-26, 70-52, 72-103, 74-341, 78-M6, 81-M112, 82-M125

The Nichols-Shurtleff family papers were deposited with the Schlesinger Library between 1965 and 1978 by Mrs. Sarah (Shurcliff) Ingelfinger and in December 1974 by Sidney N. Shurcliff.

Related Material:

There is related material at the Schlesinger Library; see the Emerson and Nichols papers, 1806-1953 (MC 212) and the Nichols-Shurtleff family Additional papers, 1758-2006 (MC 766).

CONTAINER LIST

  1. Box 1: Folders 1-18
  2. Box 2: Folders 19-42
  3. Box 3: Folders 43-64
  4. Box 4: Folders 65-79
  5. Box 5: Folders 80-98
  6. Box 6: Folders 99v-115
  7. Box 7: Folders 116-133
  8. Box 8: Folders 134-150
  9. Box 9: Folders 151-168
  10. Box 10: Folders 169-182
  11. Box 11: Folders 183v-191v
  12. Box 12: Folders 192-193v
  13. Box 12A: Folders 194v-200v
  14. Box 13: Folders 201v-204v
  15. Box 14: Folders 205v-208v
  16. Box 15: Folders 209v-213v
  17. Box 16: Folders 214v-221av
  18. Box 17: Folders 222v-233v
  19. Box 18: Folders 234-238
CORRESPONDENTS INDEX This index lists only the writers of letters. Information about these individuals is not indexed; nor are subjects. The numbers are folder numbers.
CORRESPONDENTS INDEX
  1. Adams, Adelnia 137
  2. Adams, Valentino 97
  3. Aldrich, Lilian 134
  4. Alexander, Henry J. 129
  5. Allen, H.L. 81, 166
  6. Ames, Winthrop 81
  7. Andrews, Esther M. 136
  8. Andusey, H. Christian 95
  9. Appleton, William Sumner 138, 96
  10. Apthorp, L.F. 156
  11. Armstrong, Louise H. 126
  12. Arton, Clement 130
  13. Baber, Zonia 96
  14. Bagg, Ethel Mather 130, 131
  15. Bagg, Louise E. 95
  16. Baker, Roland M. 138, 156
  17. Barlow, Ellen Shaw 137
  18. Beal, Gertrude 95
  19. Beaman, Charles P. 39
  20. Beaumont,[?] 131
  21. Beck, Edith 130, 131, 132
  22. Beck, Rachel 132
  23. Beckington, Alice 96
  24. Bell, J. Mackintosh 95, 96
  25. Bennett, William A. 130
  26. Benson, Susan Fellowes 136
  27. Bickford, Carrie F. 136
  28. Biddle, Ellen McGowan 126
  29. Biddle, Nicholas 128
  30. Bird, Anna C. 137
  31. Blackwell, Alice Stone 135
  32. Blailie, Margaret 131, 134
  33. Blailie, W.B. 131
  34. Bok, Edward 63
  35. Bradley, Ralph 96
  36. Bradley, Susan H. 97, 166
  37. Briggs, L. Vernon 138
  38. Brooks, Helen L. 81
  39. Bryant, Mrs. Frank J. 134
  40. Bryant, Mrs. Sarah A. 139
  41. Burton, Agnes 69
  42. Cabot, Elise Pumpelly 126, 127, 128, 130, 134, 135, 95
  43. Cabot, Ella Lyman 133
  44. Cabot, Mabel 126, 127, 129, 131
  45. Cannon, W.B. 138
  46. Chandler, Joseph E. 97, 137
  47. Childers, Molly 134, 135
  48. Clark, Martha C. 79
  49. Clarke, Sarah 166
  50. Clarkson, Francis C. 81
  51. Clifford, Judith 81
  52. Co [?], Gertrude 25
  53. Coe, Allen H. 58
  54. Colby, James F. 96
  55. Cole, Emma Purce 135
  56. Coleman, George W, 138
  57. Coleman, Mrs. George W. 136
  58. Comins, Louise 51
  59. Compton, Florence 128
  60. Conkling, Grace Hazard 95
  61. Constantini, A.D. 127
  62. Corby, Florence 156
  63. Cordner, Caroline P. 81
  64. Cornish, Louis C. 132
  65. Cram, Elizabeth 64
  66. Cram, Ralph Adams 126
  67. Crockett, Elizabeth 25
  68. Crompton, George 136
  69. Crowmuckell, Katherine 126
  70. Cummings, Mrs. J.M[?] 132
  71. Cushing, M.S. 96
  72. Dakin, Susan D.H. 64
  73. Dall, Caroline 3
  74. Dance, Clara E. 136
  75. Danridge, Clara[?] Lucy[?] 59
  76. Davenport, A.H. 81
  77. Davenport, Charles M. 138
  78. Davie, Enid Bedfore 66
  79. de Henry, Mary 136
  80. de Heyaard [?], Julie Britten 131, 132, 133
  81. Delgado, Frederick P. 130
  82. de Rosales, Louise 135, 139
  83. Devlin, John E. Jr. 128
  84. Devlin, Marjory Standish 95
  85. Dewing, Frances Oakley 81, 128
  86. Dewing, Marie 128
  87. Diman, Georgie 40
  88. Dodderholm, Silvia 135
  89. Dodge, Agnes L. 136
  90. Dodge, Kate 138
  91. Drew [?], Elise S. [?] 67
  92. du Slete, Marian 81
  93. Dyer, William Knowlton 25
  94. Dysart, Lord 95
  95. Eggelet, Marianne 95
  96. Eliot, Charles W. 129, 134
  97. Eliot, Francis H. 63, 70
  98. Eliot, Grace H. 134
  99. Elliot, Lillie H. 139
  100. Ellis, Bradford H. 96
  101. Emerson, Eugenie 94, 121, 122, 155 164
  102. Emerson, Oliver P. 122
  103. Evans, Elizabeth Glendower (Gardiner) 156
  104. Falconer, Bolivar L. 137
  105. Farr, B.H. 96
  106. Fenno, Pauline Shaw 138
  107. Flagg, Eleanor 136
  108. Flinch, Freda 131
  109. Flint, Esther M. 125
  110. Flint, Mary R. 25
  111. Font, Maria A. 129
  112. Fopiano, Albert B. 95
  113. Foster, Bertha [?] I. 96
  114. Fox, John R. 132, 133 134, 135, 137, 138
  115. Frederickson, Josephine 134
  116. Frothingham, Olga 136
  117. Furness, Dawes E. 57
  118. Gair, Beatrice M. 134
  119. Gardner, Cecil 81
  120. Gardner, Isabella S. 95
  121. Gebbs, Charles W.
  122. Gray, Amy 61
  123. Greenslet, Ferris 137
  124. Gregg, James E. 134
  125. Grimes, Frances 132, 133
  126. Guth, Jeanne N. 95
  127. Hale, Margaret 139
  128. Hale, Oliver B. 137
  129. Halperin, Theodore 139
  130. Harlow, John 170
  131. Harrold, Elizabeth Sears 63
  132. Haynes, Edith M. 136
  133. Hazleton, Mary B. 57
  134. Healy, Mary Tenney 136
  135. Henauly, Jeanne de 126
  136. Henshaw,Sallie 95
  137. Hernandez, Angela 129, 130
  138. Hernandez, Mercedes 129
  139. Higbee, Cornelia P. 96
  140. Higginson, Corina 136, 139
  141. Hobhonse, Emily 156
  142. Homer, Constance Sr. 122
  143. Homer, Ella 94, 122
  144. Homer, Hester 121
  145. Homer, Joseph [Jr.] 94, 121, 122
  146. Homer, Joseph Sr. 46, 122
  147. Homer, Louise 95, 121
  148. Homer, Margery S. 121, 122
  149. Homer, Mrs. Thomas 80, 92, 122, [164]
  150. Homer, Sidney Jr. 121
  151. Homer, Tom 94, 122, 155
  152. Hooker, Grace E. 127, 128, 130, 133, 134
  153. Hoppin, Constance B. 133
  154. Hoppin, Francis 131, 133
  155. Hoppin, Frederick S. Jr. 127, 128
  156. Hoppin, Tracy 131, 132 133
  157. Houlihan James F. 39
  158. Howells, Mildred 137
  159. Hubbard, Marion R. 136
  160. Hunnewell, Julia O. 136
  161. Hunter, Eveleen M. 131, 132
  162. Huntington, Catherine 138
  163. Hurley, William E. 138
  164. Huston, Desmond Chapman 137
  165. Ide, Caroline Matilda (Keegan) 175
  166. Irwin, Agnes 134
  167. James, E.H. 137
  168. James, William 131
  169. Jenness, Alice C. 81
  170. Jenness, M.A. 81
  171. Jefferson, Bessy G. 81
  172. Jefferson, G.I. [?] 59
  173. Jefferson, Rebecca Gorham 128
  174. Jessup, Henry W. 156
  175. Joy, Mary Rutherford 96, 130, 131, 136
  176. Keegan, Alice McDermot 179
  177. Keegan, McDermot Warburton 181
  178. Keegan, Hannah (Parsons) 173
  179. Keegan, Patrick James 170
  180. Keegan, William James 174
  181. Keegan, James 170
  182. Keith, Emma C. 52
  183. Kelley, Lilla Elizabeth 136
  184. Kemal, Monklid 81
  185. Kersbaum, Francis Stewart 64, 96
  186. Kimball, Marguerite 136
  187. King, Louisa 70
  188. Kirstein, Mary Sheerin 137
  189. Klumpke, A.E. 139
  190. Lamb, Aimee 138
  191. Langmard, Bertha 138
  192. Laverock, Belle Radcliffe 133
  193. Lawrence, Madeline 136
  194. Lee, Georgia 61
  195. Livingston, Anne Lorraine 137
  196. London, Ida 132
  197. Long, Margaret A. 129, 131
  198. Lopez, Fomos F. 25
  199. Lotty, H.C. 55
  200. Loughlin, Isabel 136
  201. Lowell, Amy 128
  202. Lowell, Carlotta Russell 134
  203. Lowell, J.S. 131
  204. Luscomb, Florence H. 136
  205. Lyman, Arthur 129
  206. Lyman, Mabel 133, 138
  207. Lyman, W.W. Jr. 134, 135
  208. MacKaye, Percy 96
  209. Macnair, W.M. 136
  210. McCall, Samuel W. 81
  211. McCormick, S.B. 166
  212. McKibbin, Emily 96, 136
  213. Mekins, Mary Lu 127
  214. Mitzlaff, Margareta E. 135, 136
  215. Mo [?], E.P. 61
  216. Moors, Virginia F. 136
  217. Mouncey, Hansen 81
  218. Munro, Caroline S.G. 136
  219. Murdoch, Minnie W. 25
  220. Nadah, E.S. 47
  221. Nasmyth, George 156
  222. Nela, Francine 64
  223. Nelson, Mary Kilbourn 139
  224. Nichols, Arthur Howard 1-24
  225. Nichols, Elizabath Fisher (Homer) 27-79
  226. Nichols, Marian Clarke 105-120
  227. Nichols, Mary Ann (Clarke) 93, 123
  228. Nichols, Rose Standish 83-90
  229. Noguens [?], E. 70
  230. Norton, Margaret Palmer 95
  231. Norton, Sara 97
  232. Nott, Otto 139
  233. Oakley,Imogen B. 136, 137
  234. O'Clough, B.M. 97
  235. Olmsted, Frederick Law 96
  236. O'Reilly, Jane Elliot 139
  237. Osborne, Maurice M. 96
  238. Osgood, Margaret C. 136
  239. Osgood, Robert B. 81
  240. Otis, Elizabeth W. 136
  241. Page, A.P.S. 96
  242. Page, Lilian 139
  243. Parker, Edwin A. [?] 125
  244. Parkamn, Henry Jr. 137
  245. Parsons, Lucas 173
  246. Parsons, M.N. 156
  247. Payne, J.B. 96
  248. Penniman, Jennie C. 137
  249. Perkins, Louise S.W. 133, 136
  250. Perkins, Mary F. 81
  251. Perkins, Maxwell E. 137
  252. Perkins, Yolanda 87
  253. Pierce, Marjorie B. 136
  254. Pinkham, Wenona Osborne 136
  255. Plowden, M.C. 96
  256. Poole, Grace Morrison 136
  257. Porter [?], Joseph 25
  258. Pouzzner, Georgianna 138
  259. Prellwitz, Henry 97
  260. Pumpelly, Daisy 126
  261. Pumpelly, Elise (see Cabot,Elise Pumpelly)
  262. Pumpelly, Eliza S. 81,131, 166
  263. Pumpelly, Pauline 127, 128
  264. Pumpelly, Raphael 95
  265. Putnam, Elizabeth C. 135, 136
  266. Putnam, F. Delano 138
  267. Putnam, Mary B. 137
  268. Raymond, A. Pauline 135
  269. Reed, Rebekah T. 25
  270. Repper, Charles 138
  271. Richard, Grant 58
  272. Richmond, Arthur 132
  273. Ripley, William Z. 136
  274. Ritchie, Dick 137
  275. Ritchie, Effie 133
  276. Robinson, J. Elizabeth 61
  277. Roepper, Nina B. 136
  278. Rosenwald, Augusta N. 64
  279. Roth, Asa 55
  280. Rush, Anne 96, [97]
  281. Russell, Laura Laing 96
  282. Salmon, Lucy M. 134
  283. St. Gaudens, Augustus 30, 80, 94, 124
  284. St. Gaudens, Homer 124, 155,[166]
  285. St. Gaudens, Marie 84, 94
  286. Sanford, Vera 126
  287. Sapbla [?], Libia 129
  288. Saumarer [?], I.A. de 130
  289. Sawyer, Leslie 156
  290. Sayre, Jessie 156
  291. Schieffelin, H.M. 176
  292. Scieffelin, Mary Elizabeth (Keegan) Harlow 176
  293. Schieffelin, Matilda 176
  294. Schieffelin, Philip 176
  295. Schoier, William D. 95
  296. Scott, Lilian 128
  297. Sears, Evelyn 126, 128, 129, 130 132
  298. Sears, Sarah P. 81
  299. Sedgwick, Ellery 137
  300. Sever, Emily 81
  301. Sever, Francis W. 57, 136
  302. Sharfman, Zina 130
  303. Shattuck, Corine 126
  304. Shaw, Pauline Agassiz 126, 134
  305. Shipman, Ellen 81, 96, 136
  306. Shipman, Louis 95
  307. Shortt, Adam 134
  308. Shurtleff, Alice 125
  309. Shurtleff, Arthur Asahel 94, 173 235
  310. Shurtleff, Asahel Milton 170, 188a vo
  311. Shurtleff, Ernest 173
  312. Shurtleff, Gertrude Hope 81, [166], 167, 254
  313. Shurtleff, Helen C. 81
  314. Shurtleff, Margaret Homer (Nichols) 150-154, 167
  315. Shurtleff, Miranda 235
  316. Shurtleff, Sarah Ann (Keegan) 185, 186, 188a vo
  317. Shurtleff, Sidney Nichols 80, 91, 125
  318. Sidgweth, Eleanor Mildred 130
  319. Sieveking, A. Forbes 95
  320. Silverman, Bertha 131
  321. Smith, Anne E. 128
  322. Smith, Charles 96
  323. Smith, Constance Homer 121, 122
  324. Smith, Mabel J. 136
  325. Smith, Theodore Clarke 135, 136, 137
  326. Smyth, H.S. 131
  327. Spinney[?], Dorthea 134
  328. Stairs [?]. Helen 96
  329. Staumfeld. [?], William 95
  330. Stedman, C.E. 25
  331. Stewart, Roberta D. 137
  332. Stillman, Lisa 130, 137
  333. Stillman, Marie [96], 97 130, 131 132,134
  334. Storrow, Helen 138
  335. Sturgis, [?] 24
  336. Taylor, Annie Newhall 137
  337. Taylor, J. Edith 135
  338. Taylor, Margaret 137
  339. Tchitcherine, Sophy 95
  340. Tetlow [?], Helen I. 139
  341. Thacher, Mary 136
  342. Thines, Ellen 95
  343. Thomas, F. Inego 130
  344. Thompson, Katharine A. 138
  345. Tileston, Margaret A. 129, 131
  346. Titoff, Beatrice 97
  347. Tucker, Emma H. 132
  348. Turnbull, Mary D. 81
  349. Upham,George B. 81
  350. Utley, [?] 235
  351. Villard, Oswald Garrison 134
  352. Walker, Laura M. 25
  353. Walker, Vivian 135
  354. Walton, Lawton 59
  355. Warren, Alice 95
  356. Wells, Louisa A. 136

Processing Information

Re-processed: March 1977

By: Patricia Affholter
Link to catalog
Title
Nichols family. Papers of the Nichols-Shurtleff family, 1780-1953 (inclusive), 1850-1940 (bulk): A Finding Aid
Author
Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women
Sponsor
The collection was re-processed under NEH Grant Number RC 24669-76-987.
EAD ID
sch00112

Repository Details

Part of the Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute Repository

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