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COLLECTION Identifier: 177; Mf-1

Papers of Charlotte Perkins Gilman, 1846-1961

Papers of writer Charlotte Perkins Gilman.

Dates

  • 1846-1961

Language of Materials

Materials in English.

Access Restrictions:

Access: Originals closed; use digital images.

Extent

16.98 linear feet ((29 boxes, 2 card file boxes, 1 folio box, 1 folio+ box, 1 oversize box) plus 2 supersize folders, 10 photograph folders)

The present collection adds to the published evidence illumination primarily of Gilman's personal life, but also shows the consistency of her ideas throughout her life and, in the unpublished manuscripts, their later development. For the early years the journals and diaries are useful, but in the 1880s and 1890s entries are often sporadic due to her periods of illness, and after 1903 there are only engagement books, with at most very brief entries. The two "Thoughts and Figgerings" folders (16, 17) provide revealing glimpses of her plans, hopes, and her attitude toward herself and her life, as do the letters to Houghton and the later years of her life. The correspondence and newsclippings show her impact and the often extreme reactions she aroused, ranging from grateful adoration to vituperation (always anonymous), though her habit of destroying most personal letters leaves some perhaps unanswerable questions about her closer relationships.

N.B. Where labels or dates noted by Katharine Stetson Chamberlin (mostly on newsclippings) seemed to us to be inaccurate, the cataloguer has added alternative information, enclosed in square brackets. Charlotte Perkins Gilman is referred to in the folder headings by the name she used at the time: "Charlotte Anna Perkins" from 1860-1884; "Charlotte Perkins Stetson" from 1884-1900; and "Charlotte Perkins Gilman" after 1900.

BIOGRAPHY

Charlotte Perkins Gilman, independent thinker, prolific writer, and gifted speaker, was the intellectual leader of the women's movement from the late 1890s through the mid-1920s. Influenced by Lester F. Ward's gynaecocentric theory and Edward Bellamy's Nationalism, she was a socialist but not a Marxist; a Deist with no concern for an afterlife, considering God an impersonal working power; an advocate of economic independence for women, with the ballot of secondary importance. She believed that sex differences were overemphasized at the expense of a humanness common to men and women, and that mankind had become debased by sexual over-indulgence. She considered ethics not a religious matter but a social science, and the group, not the individual, the basic unit in both ethics and economics. In place of the dictum, "He who does not work shall not eat," she suggested that "He who does not eat cannot work": that if people's needs were satisfied they would work because they wanted to. Though she rejected cooperative living and strongly supported the private home, she believed it should be a place to rest--not a place to work; that cooking, cleaning and child-rearing should be done by professionals; and that children should be treated as rational human beings, allowed a good deal of freedom, and dressed to allow for movement and activity. Sensible dress and shoes for women was among her earliest interests, as was physical fitness: at 21 she arranged for the first women's gym in Providence; at 65 she was still an impressive swimmer. Her lecturing was always in essence preaching, her writing--even poems, plays, novels, and stories--always didactic. Her interests and views remained fairly constant throughout her life, as did her decidedly rational and optimistic outlook. In later years, however, there were some new interests, notably Freud, birth control, and immigrants. Freud she attacked for his "sexolatry," which seemed to her to promote the views of sex she had argued against all her life. She approved of birth control as a means to greater freedom for women and to improvement of the race, but disapproved of it as promoting sex for pleasure rather than procreation. She deplored the increased influx of immigrants, whom she felt to be unassimilable and a threat to true "Americans."

Gilman was born Charlotte Anna Perkins on July 3, 1860, in Hartford, Connecticut. Her mother, Mary Fitch Westcott, had married a second cousin, the well-known librarian and bibliophile, Frederic Beecher Perkins, grandson of Lyman Beecher, nephew of Henry Ward Beecher and Harriet Beecher Stowe. Gilman herself and others attributed her lifelong talent for speaking--and especially preaching--with ease and power to her Beecher heritage. Her brother, Thomas Adie, was 14 months older; there were two siblings who died in infancy.

Charlotte's childhood was characterized by poverty, almost continual moving from place to place (her mother's list of "movings" in folder 1 includes places in Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York, and Rhode Island), and the absence of her father, the last being the cause of the other two conditions. He apparently left when she was an infant, taking posts as head first of the new Boston Public Library and later of the San Francisco Public Library, paying only rare visits to his family and sending very little money. When Charlotte was 13 the family of three settled in Providence, Rhode Island, and remained there, at various addresses, until she herself moved away. Her formal schooling was sporadic, a total of four years between the ages of 7 and 15, two years at the Rhode Island School of Design and, in her early twenties, a course with the Society for the Encouragement of Studies at Home (see folders 160 for school essays, 315-321, volumes 9-11 and oversize folders 4o and 4af+ for her drawings). Meanwhile she read widely on her own, largely in the fields of history and evolution, with some guidance from her father (see folder 26 for a reading list in his handwriting), and strove diligently and systematically to improve her character, with the aim, conceived in childhood, of helping and improving the human race. Some of this process is recorded in volumes 15 to 19.

In 1882 she met a young artist, Charles Walter Stetson. Though she loved him and felt him to be a kindred spirit she struggled for months with the question, not of whether she wanted to marry him, but of whether she should, for she felt she had serious work to do (though not yet sure what it was) and that to choose personal happiness was wrong. She did choose it, however, and married Walter Stetson on May 4, 1884. Their daughter, Katharine Beecher Stetson (later married to F. Tolles Chamberlin), was born March 23, 1885. Even during the first months of marriage, Mrs. Stetson suffered from frequent periods of depression and enforced idleness, which increased after the birth of the child. On the doctor's advice, she took a trip west from October 1885 to March 1886. She visited her brother in Ogden, Utah, and her father in San Francisco, and spent the winter with her friends the Channings (including her life-long friend, Grace Ellery Channing) in Pasadena, California. Her condition improved as soon as she left home, but, the depression returning full force upon her return to Providence, the Stetsons decided in the fall of 1887 that separation was inevitable. After a long visit from Grace Channing in the summer of 1888, during which they wrote the first of several plays together and planned future work (see folders 214-216), Charlotte took Katharine and returned to Pasadena with Grace in October of that year. Walter followed them in December and stayed for over a year, till both realized it was useless. Attempts at divorce, complicated by the fact that there were no obvious grounds, finally succeeded in April 1894. Walter Stetson thereupon married Grace Channing, the Stetsons and Charlotte remaining friends and sharing Katharine's upbringing.

Charlotte Perkins' first published work was the poem, "One Girl of Many," which appeared in The Alpha, probably in 1880; The Woman's Journal also published some of her verse in the 1880s (see oversize volume 7o). In Pasadena, recovering from the mental turmoil of her married life and thrown on her own resources, she began to write and speak professionally, earning enough to keep herself and Katharine. In 1890 alone she wrote 33 articles and 23 poems, and she spoke to women's clubs, Nationalist groups, and others. Soon after attending a meeting of the Pacific Coast Women's Press Association (PCWPA) in San Francisco, she moved to Oakland, in the summer of 1891; during the next four years its monthly paper, The Bulletin, and editing it--with Helen Campbell--under the title The Impress from 1893 to 1895 (see folder 238, volumes 1o and 2o). Her mother came to live with her but died in March 1893 of cancer.

During these years she continued to lecture, give classes (see folders 163-172), and write prose and verse, some of it published (in the Union Signal, Christian Register, Kate Field's Washington, etc.), some of it not (see volume 23). In 1892 her story of insanity, "The Yellow Wallpaper," was published in New England Magazine, winning her attention both positive and negative, the former notably from William Dean Howells. Her poems meanwhile were collected into a small volume, In This Our World, published in Oakland in 1893 (folder 269). In 1894 she moved to San Francisco, sending Katharine to the Stetsons; Frederic Perkins, who was then leaving San Francisco, accompanied the child on the train to Providence.

In 1895 The Impress ceased publication and Charlotte Perkins Stetson, rather discouraged by her lonely life, the years of poverty, and the sometimes vicious press reaction to her divorce and the supposed abandonment of her child, accepted a long-standing invitation from Jane Addams to visit Hull House. She spent the rest of the 1890s traveling and lecturing: attending a suffrage convention in Washington, D.C., in January 1896 (when she first met Lester F. Ward); going to England in July 1896 to the International Socialist and Labor Congress (and meeting Alfred Russel Wallace, George Bernard Shaw, the Webbs, Jaures, William Morris and other leading socialists: see folder 5); and again to the International Women's Congress in London in 1899 (folder 6). All through these years, she continued to write prose and verse--becoming contributing editor of The American Fabian (Volume 3o) in December 1896--and also to suffer periodically from bouts of weakness and depression.

In March 1897 she called on her cousin George Houghton Gilman at his law office in New York, for advice on getting a royalty payment from a dishonest agent. Houghton's mother, Katharine Beecher Perkins Gilman, was the sister of Charlotte's father, and the two cousins, she seven years his senior, had visited and corresponded years earlier (see folders 33 and 38). Their new friendship soon blossomed into romance; fortunately, Houghton saved the hundreds of letters (folders 40-86) Charlotte wrote him during the next three years (though she did not keep his); they make a valuable record of her professional activities, the development of her thought, and the often stormy oscillations of her feelings; in fact, they reveal a side of her nature--as a woman of passion, less than one-hundred percent independent--which otherwise, even in her autobiography, she kept carefully hidden. Again she struggled with her doubts as to her right to be happy, but Houghton held firm, they were married in Detroit on June 11, 1900, an in her subsequent life she apparently managed successfully to reconcile her work for women and humanity at large with her own private happiness.

Meantime, in the summer and fall of 1897, she had written the book that brought her fame, Women and Economics. It was published the next year, together with an enlarged edition of In This Our World. Though Gilman herself considered Human Work, written during the winter of 1898-1899, her most important contribution, Women and Economics, with its argument that women need economic independence--and not just the ballot--to be truly free and equal, and that society as a whole would be better for their full participation, had the greater impact.

The Gilmans settled in New York, where they lived, moving further uptown every few years, until 1922. During the summer of 1900 Gilman wrote Concerning Children; it was published later that year, while Human Work, much rewritten, was published in 1904 and The Home in 1903. Katharine lived with the Gilmans during much of this time, and alternately with the Stetsons. For several months, Gilman was treated for her mental ailment by Dr. Mary Putnam Jacobi, with some positive results.

Besides extensive lecture trips in the United States, she attended the International Congress of Women in Berlin in 1904 (folder 7) and the International Woman Suffrage Congress in Budapest in 1913 (folder 8), and made a lecture tour of England, Holland, Germany, Austria, and Hungary in 1905 (see newsclippings in folders 288-292). After 1894 she spoke extemporaneously, so that we have no further written speeches (except a few in print in oversize folder 2af+ and two late ones in folder 173), but there is an abundance of articles from this period (folders 175-177, 180, 250, and oversize folders 1o and 1af+) in addition to the three books mentioned above.

Dissatisfied with the reactions of editors to her contributions, she launched her own monthly magazine, The Forerunner, in November 1909. She wrote, edited, and published it virtually single-handed until she gave it up in 1916, partly because she was "written out" and partly because she felt that, as there was an insufficient market for it (it never paid for itself), it was wrong to continue publishing it. It included several full-length books in serial form and numerous stories, articles, reviews, and poems, always emphasizing her ideas in the fields of economics, ethics, women's rights, and child-rearing (see folders 239-242, 331). Of the serialized books, The Crux, The Man-Made World, Moving the Mountain, and What Diantha Did were published separately by the Charlton Co. (Charlotte plus Houghton), which published The Forerunner.

During 1919 she wrote a series of articles for the New York Tribune syndicate (folders 129, 252) and many articles were published in the 1920s, but demand for her lectures, and later her articles too, began to decline after the passage of the 19th amendment. She published one more book, His Religion and Hers, in 1923, wrote and rewrote her Social Ethics (there are four versions, folders 227-230), and made plans, which never materialized, for a new edition of all her works (folder 20). Her friend Amy Wellington compiled a new volume of poems, also never published (folders 35, 125, 185-96). Her autobiography, The Living of Charlotte Perkins Gilman, was published posthumously in October 1935.

In 1922 the Gilmans moved to the Gilman house in Norwich Town, Connecticut; Charlotte at least was relieved to leave New York, with its majority of "non-Americans." Houghton died suddenly on May 4, 1934; in September Charlotte moved to Pasadena to be near her daughter, who lived there with her husband and two children (Dorothy and Walter). She gave some lectures and classes that winter but her health was failing. In 1932 she had learned that she had breast cancer; on August 17, 1935, realizing that she could no longer be well or useful, she ended her life with chloroform (see folder 226 for her writings on euthanasia and suicide).

ARRANGEMENT

The collection is arranged in nine series:
  1. Series I. Biographical and miscellaneous. Folders 1-25.
  2. Series II. Family correspondence. Folders 26-113.
  3. Series III. General correspondence Folders 114-158.
  4. ___Subseries A. Alphabetical. Folders 114-125.
  5. ___Subseries B. Publishers. Folders 126-135.
  6. ___Subseries C. Chronological. Folders 136-149.
  7. ___Subseries D. Foreign, miscellaneous. Folders 150-158.
  8. Series IV. Writings. Folders 159-281, volumes 1o-4o 5, 6.
  9. ___Subseries A. Manuscripts and typescripts by Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Folders 159-242.
  10. ______a. Early writings, outlines. Folders 159-161.
  11. ______b. Sermons, lectures. Folders 162-173.
  12. ______c. Articles. Folders 174-184.
  13. ______d. Poems. Folders 185-213.
  14. ______e. Plays. Folders 214-220.
  15. ______f. Stories, miscellaneous. Folders 221-226.
  16. ______g. Books. Folders 227-236+.
  17. ______h. Magazines. Folders 237-242.
  18. ___Subseries B. Manuscripts and typescripts by others. Folders 243-247.
  19. ___Subseries C. Printed, mostly by Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Folders 248-281, volumes 1o-4o 5, 6.
  20. Series V. Newsclippings. Folders 282-313, volumes 7o, 8o.
  21. ___Subseries A. General. Folders 282-297.
  22. ___Subseries B. Reviews. Folders 298-313, volumes 7o, 8o.
  23. Series VI. Drawings. Folders 314-324, volumes 9-11.
  24. Series VII. Photographs. Folders 325-335.
  25. Series VIII. Notebooks and diaries. Folders 336-342, volumes 12-77.
  26. Series IX. Oversize and memorabilia. Folders 1o, 1af+, 2o, 2af+, 3o, 3af+, 4o, 4af+, 5o, 5af+, 5b+, 343-344.
  27. ___Subseries A. Oversize. Folders 1o, 1af+, 2o, 2af+, 3o, 3af+, 4o, 4af+, 5o, 5af+, 5b+.
  28. ___Subseries B. Memorabilia. Folders 343-344.

Immediate Source of Acquisition

Accession number: 72-128

The papers of Charlotte Perkins Gilman were deposited with the Schlesinger Library by her daughter, Katharine Beecher Stetson Chamberlin, in 1971 and 1972.

Related Material:

There is related material at the Schlesinger Library; see Charlotte Perkins Gilman Papers , 1846-ca.1975 (MC 588).

CONTAINER LIST

  1. Box 1: Folders 1-12
  2. Box 2: Folders 13-28
  3. Box 3: Folders 29-47
  4. Box 4: Folders 48-62
  5. Box 5: Folders 63-76
  6. Box 6: Folders 77-86
  7. Box 7: Folders 87-102, 104
  8. Box 8: Folders 105-126
  9. Box 9: Folders 127-138
  10. Box 10: Folders 139-146
  11. Box 11: Folders 147-159
  12. Box 12: Folders 160-166
  13. Box 13: Folders 167-172
  14. Box 14: Folders 173-181
  15. Box 15: Folders 182-203
  16. Box 16: Folders 204-218
  17. Box 17: Folders 219-227
  18. Box 18: Folders 228-232
  19. Box 19: Folders 233-235, 237-249
  20. Box 20: Folders 250-269
  21. Box 21: Folders 270-278
  22. Box 22: Folders 279-292
  23. Box 23: Folders 293-308
  24. Box 24: Folders 309-324
  25. Box 25: Folders 336-342, volumes 5-6, 9-16, 18
  26. Box 26: Folders 336-338, volumes 19-31
  27. Box 27: Folders 339-342, volumes 32-44
  28. Box 28: Volumes 45-58
  29. Box 29: Volumes 59-77
  30. Card File Box 30: #343m (death mask)
  31. Card File Box 31: #344m (hands)
  32. Folio Box 32: Volume 1o - Volume 3o
  33. Folio+ Box 33: 1af+ - 5af+, Volume 8o
  34. Oversize Box 34: 1o - 5o, Volume 4o, Volume 7o
INDEX N.B. Folder or volume numbers usually refer to letters by the person named, but may refer to letters to, articles by, photographs of him or her, etc.
INDEX
  1. Abbott, Alexander H, Alexander W., Alice 114
  2. Adams, Maude 149
  3. Addams, Jane 137, 138, 155
  4. Aley, Maxwell 93
  5. Allen, Agnes Beecher 36
  6. Allen, Charles Dexter 137
  7. American Fabian 155, volume 3o
  8. American Women 146
  9. Amidon, Beulah M. 146
  10. Anthony, Susan Brownell 137, 155
  11. Archer, William 243
  12. Aschermann, Rose Bassett 141
  13. Atherton, Percy Lee 146, folder 5o
  14. Baldwin, Elizabeth 107, 108
  15. Baldwin, Emily 107, 108
  16. Barbour, Charlotte A. 129
  17. Barnett, Avram 142
  18. Barry, James H. 138, 269
  19. Bartnett, W.J. 138
  20. Bate, Florence E. 130
  21. Bay, J. Christian 155
  22. Beecher, Henry Ward 265
  23. Beecher, Mary F. 11
  24. Bellamy Edward 137, volume 3o
  25. Black, Alexander 116, 266, 267, 271
  26. Blackwell, Alice Stone 20, 141, 147
  27. Bland, Edith Nesbit 150
  28. Blatch, Harriot Stanton 147
  29. Bowker, R.R. 137
  30. Boyesen, Hjalmar H., 2nd 126
  31. Bristol, Julia Silliman Gilman 36, 84, 110
  32. Bruère, Martha B. 117, 270
  33. Bruère, Robert W. 117
  34. Burrows, Herbert 5, 271
  35. Bynner, Witter 134, 139
  36. Campbell, Helen 76, 141, 266
  37. Canby, Henry S. 129
  38. Carlberg, Frigga 152
  39. Carruth, Hayden 133
  40. Catt, Carrie Chapman 147, 149, 153, 156, 270, 284
  41. Chamberlin, Katharine Beecher Stetson 34, 87-106, 111, 127, 148, 156, 156a, 157, 203, 205, 212, 224, 234, 239, 318, 325
  42. Chamberlin, Walter S. 36, 105a, 153
  43. Chautauqua Institution 138
  44. Clark, Thomas Curtis 145, 146
  45. Clegg, Susan 150
  46. Coats, Daisy Baumerman 147
  47. Commander, Lydia Kingsmith 138
  48. Connolly, Margaret 133
  49. Cooley, Stoughton 129
  50. Corbett, Katherine M. 85, 212
  51. Davies, Walford 150, 155
  52. Dawson, Julia 133
  53. Day, Alice H. 50, 110
  54. Degler, Carl N. 156, 266
  55. Democratic National Committee 142
  56. Dodge, Hannah 146
  57. Dow, Marietta A. 82
  58. Dowie, Annie 150
  59. Doyle, William Theodore 3, 156
  60. Dreiser, Theordore 126
  61. Eberle, Abostenia St. L. 147
  62. Eberle, Louise E. 133, 139
  63. Elder, Helen Irene 142, 143
  64. Eschenbrenner, Josephine J. 141, 196
  65. Farmer, Sarah J. 137
  66. Fawcett, Mrs. M. G. 150
  67. Feakins, William B. 140, 334
  68. Fillmore, Parker 93, 213
  69. Gale, Zona 118, 127, 153
  70. Gates, Susa Young 81, volume 7o
  71. General Federation of Women's Clubs 155
  72. Gillette, William 137, 145, 296
  73. Gilman, Charlotte Perkins (letters from) 28, 37-105, 110, 112, 122, 129, 131-134, 141-143, 145-147, 152-154, 157, 193
  74. Gilman, Edward W. 113
  75. Gilman, Elisabeth 36
  76. Gilman, Francis 36, 110, 114
  77. Gilman, George Houghton 1, 2, 22, 23, 33, 38, 40-86, 91, 92, 94, 100, 106, 140, 196, 212, 270, 283, 296, 321, 325, 326, 331, 332, 334, volume 77
  78. Gilman, Julia Silliman 36, 84, 110
  79. Gilman, Katharine Beecher Perkins 36, 108, 109
  80. Gilman, William Coit 36, 113, volume 7o
  81. Grant, Jane 149
  82. Green, Mary B. 146, 153, 205
  83. Grove, Harriet (Hamburg Women's Club) 143
  84. Grover, Edwin Osgood 144, 145
  85. Hale, Edward Evertt 36, 113
  86. Hale, Emily 84, 110
  87. Hall, Bolton 137
  88. Hamilton, Ethel Beecher 100
  89. Hardie, J. Keir 150, 335
  90. Harvey, W. W. 145, 147
  91. Hearn, James A., and Son 141
  92. Hedge, Charlotte A. 142, 153
  93. Herford, Oliver 129, 145
  94. Herne, James A. 137
  95. Herrod, George D. 137
  96. Higgins, Edwin W. 119
  97. Hill, Caroline M. 143
  98. Holder, Charles Frederick 205, 237
  99. Holt, Hamilton 128, 153
  100. Hooker, Isabella Beecher 36
  101. Hooker, John H. 36
  102. Howe, Harriet 78
  103. Howe, Louise C. 147
  104. Howells, William Dean 120
  105. Howes, Durward 146
  106. International Congress Against Alcoholism 9, 142
  107. International Woman Suffrage Congress 8, 152
  108. Irwin, Inez Haynes 143, 146, 147
  109. Jastram, Edward P. 115
  110. Johnson, W. H. 129
  111. Johnston, Mary 141, 142, 143
  112. Jones, Brummell 137
  113. Jordan, David Starr 137
  114. Jordan, Elizabeth 126
  115. Joy, Jason S. 144
  116. Kaneko, Kiichi 139
  117. Kansas Equal Suffrage Association 44, 137
  118. Kelley, Ethel M. 126
  119. Kelley, Florence 137
  120. Kitchelt, Florence Ledyard Cross 147
  121. Knapp, Adeline E. 137
  122. Kramers, Martina G. 152
  123. Laciar, S. L. 129
  124. [Lane?], Chester 142
  125. Lane, Martha Jessie Luther 147, 149, 205, 213
  126. Lee, Vernon 243, 300, volume 6
  127. Vinville, Henry R. 110
  128. Lorimer, George H. 127, 133
  129. Lummis, Charles F. 137, 138, 325
  130. McClure, Robert 130
  131. McClure, S. S. 130
  132. MacKinlay, Antoinette Sterling 150
  133. McMillan, R. 152, volume 7o
  134. Mann, Prestonia 203, 205, 280
  135. Marholm, Laura 279
  136. Marshall, Benjamin T. 110
  137. Martin, Prestonia Mann 203, 205, 280
  138. Merrill, A. A. 139
  139. Millikin, V. V. 155, 204
  140. Mitchell, S. Weir 267
  141. Moore, Frances 152
  142. Morris, May 151
  143. Morris, William 275
  144. Morse, Cora A. 78
  145. National American Woman Suffrage Association 137, 141, 155, 156
  146. National Child Labor Committee 141, 143, 271
  147. National Woman's Party 153
  148. Nelson, N. O. 138
  149. Neuhauser, May 141, 142
  150. New York Times 153, volume 7o
  151. New York Tribune 129, 252
  152. Norman, Méme Muriel 150
  153. Norwich Americanization Institute 143, 144
  154. O'Neil, James B. 146
  155. O'Neil, Rose Cecil 121
  156. Open Forum Speakers Bureau 143
  157. O'Shea, M. V. 143
  158. Pacific Coast Woman's Press Association 285, volume 1o, 2o
  159. Page, G. H. 142, 212
  160. Page, L. C. 129
  161. Palmer Photoplay Corporation 143
  162. Perkins, Basil C. 31, 102
  163. Perkins, Elna 31
  164. Perkins, Frederic Beecher 26, 37, 107, 296, 314, volume 7o, 12
  165. Perkins, Lucy Fitch 36
  166. Perkins, Margaret Gardiner 30
  167. Perkins, Mary Fitch Westcott 1, 109, volume 14
  168. Perkins, Thomas Adie 27-29, 113, 265, 315, 331, 339, volume 26, oversize folder 5
  169. Perkins, Thomas, Jr. 32
  170. Phelon, Mary Dana 91
  171. Phelps, William Lyon 146
  172. Pinkham, Wenona Osborne 142
  173. Pironti, Carolina di Conti 152, volume 6
  174. Pond, James B. 10, 137, 138
  175. Putnam, G. H. 129
  176. Radcliffe-Whitehead, Ralph 53
  177. Reedy, William Marion 141
  178. Reynolds, Paul R. 138
  179. Rhodes, Eugene Manlove 142, 143, 145
  180. Riesz, Helene 152, 155
  181. Romero (James), Concha 143
  182. Ross, Edward Alsworth 139, 141, 145, 147
  183. Ross, Rosamond C. 139
  184. Ruedy, Augus 146, oversize folder 2
  185. Sanders, Frederic W. 141
  186. Sanger, Margaret 146
  187. Schmalhausen, Samuel D. 122
  188. Schwimmer, Rosika 152, 266
  189. Scudder, H. E. 126
  190. Senter, Augusta 138
  191. Shaw, Mary 142, 189
  192. Shelby, Edmund P. 24, 123
  193. Shively, George 112
  194. Sinclair, Upton 267
  195. Small, Albion W. 126
  196. Smith, Reed 147
  197. Snowden, Ethel 139
  198. Solomons, S.? 78, 137
  199. Sparling, May Morris 151
  200. Speirs, Frederic W. 126
  201. Spurr, Aimée E. 141, 155, 326, 331
  202. Stetson, Charles Walter 1, 39, 205, 282, 315, 317, volumes 18, 20, 21, oversize folder 4
  203. Stetson, Grace Ellery Channing 21, 127, 138, 214-216, 243, 244
  204. Stokes, John Graham Phelps, 147, 332
  205. Stowe, Charles Edward 36, 157, 265
  206. Stowe, Elizabeth 36
  207. Stowe, Hilda Robinson Smith 35
  208. Stowe, Lyman Beecher 35, 111, 112, 156, 264
  209. Stritt, Marie 7
  210. Sumner, Francis B. 83, 213
  211. Swain, Elizabeth 137
  212. Tapley, Rober 129
  213. Thurston, William R. 158, 270
  214. Tower, James E. 126
  215. Tutwiler, Julia R. 139
  216. Tyner, Paul 110, 137
  217. Unwin, T. Fisher 133
  218. Upton, Harriet Taylor 137
  219. Vance, Arthur T. 126, 132, 133, 153
  220. Walker, John B. 126
  221. Wallace, Alfred Russel 150
  222. Ward, Julia P. 149
  223. Ward, Lester Frank 124, 267, 280
  224. Warwick, Lady Frances Evelyn 149, 150
  225. Webster, Mary L. 83
  226. Wellington, Amy 84, 125, 185-195
  227. Wells, Herbert George 150
  228. Wheeler, Alice Gilman 36
  229. White, Trumbell 126
  230. Whiting, Lillian 155
  231. Whitner, Annie B. 146
  232. Whitney, Margaret D. 110
  233. Whitney, Marian P. 36
  234. Whitney, Parkhurst 131
  235. Wildman, Edwin 133
  236. Willard, Frances 137
  237. Williams, Anna L. B. 153, 155
  238. Williams, John L. B. 127
  239. Wilson, Rose Cecil O'Neil 121
  240. Wing, Willis Kingsley 112, 127, 146, 147, 156
  241. Wolinski, Pauline 147
  242. Woman's Committee for Political Action 144
  243. Woman's Peace Party 141, 142
  244. Women's Congress Association of the Pacific Coast 4, 285, oversize folder 1
  245. Workman, Mrs. Hoyle 146, 147
  246. Wright, Alice A. 137
  247. Yoder, A. H. 138, 146
  248. Young, Daniel K. 137
  249. Zangwill, E. 150

Processing Information

Processed: December 1972

By: Eva Moseley

Updated: 2010

By: Jenny Gotwals
Link to catalog
Title
Gilman, Charlotte Perkins, 1860-1935. Papers of Charlotte Perkins Gilman, 1846-1961: A Finding Aid
Author
Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America
EAD ID
sch00019

Repository Details

Part of the Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute Repository

The preeminent research library on the history of women in the United States, the Schlesinger Library documents women's lives from the past and present for the future.

Contact:
3 James St.
Cambridge MA 02138 USA
(617) 495-8647