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COLLECTION Identifier: MC 324; M-44

Papers of Pauline Newman, 1900-1980

Correspondence, reports, photographs, etc., of labor organizer Pauline Newman.

Dates

  • 1900-1980

Language of Materials

Materials in English.

Access Restrictions:

Access. Unrestricted.

Conditions Governing Use

Copyright. Copyright in the papers created by Pauline Newman is held by the President and Fellows of Harvard College for the Schlesinger Library. Copyright in other papers in the collection may be held by their authors, or the authors' heirs or assigns.

Copying. Papers may be copied in accordance with the library's usual procedures.

Extent

4.17 linear feet ((10 file boxes) plus 5 photograph folders, 1 folio+ folder)

The Pauline Newman papers have been divided into five series, each arranged chronologically except where noted. There are some papers from Newman's early professional life, but most of the collection is from the period after 1930.

Series I. Personal Papers contains biographical information and personal correspondence. The two oral histories (#5, 6) are rich sources of information about Newman's life and almost the only sources in this collection of information about her childhood and family. The personal correspondence documents the warm relationship between Newman and Frieda Miller and between Newman and Miller's daughter Elisabeth, son-in-law David Owen, and grandchildren Hugh and Michael Owen. There is much biographical information in the memoir Newman wrote for the Owen boys (#3).

Series II. National and New York Women's Trade Union League. is a diverse collection of reports, correspondence and other papers about WTUL positions and programs, spanning the years of the organization's existence, 1903-1950. It illuminates Newman's role in the League and her close relationship with several of its major leaders: e.g., Leonora O'Reilly, Rose Schneiderman, Elisabeth Christman and Mary Dreier. Of special interest are the letters between Newman and Rose Schneiderman. #77 contains letters written by Newman to Schneiderman while the former was traveling through the Midwest, 1919-1913, helping unions to organize new locals and strikes; they are eloquent descriptions of early union activities and Newman's part in them. These letters are copies of originals at Tamiment Library, New York University, as part of the Rose Schneiderman papers.

Series III. The International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union is a record of Newman's long association with and devotion to the Union and the Union Health Center. Of special note are the articles by Newman, #112, 114, in which she discusses her early involvement with the Union and provides descriptions of the strikes she helped to organize.

Series IV. Other Professional Papers contains information about Newman's work for the New York State and federal governments and for other organizations. As Newman often established personal friendships with people she worked with, there has been no attempt to distinguish personal and professional correspondence. The correspondence with individuals (#141-64) is arranged alphabetically. M-44 is a microfilm of clippings (originals discarded) by and about Newman which provide a useful record of her early union activities and complements other types of records in the collection. A large number of the clippings are from Yiddish-language newspapers.

Series V. PHOTOGRAPHS. There are no photographs of Newman as a child or a young woman or of her family. #186 contains pictures of several women active in the labor movement.

BIOGRAPHY

Pauline Newman, labor organizer, Director of Health Education at the Union Health Center of the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union (ILGWU), and member of the National and New York Women's Trade Union League (NWTUL/NYWTUL), was born in Popelan, Kuvna, Lithuania, in about 1890, the youngest of Meyer and Theresa Newman's two sons and four daughters. Meyer Newman sold fruit and taught Talmud to the well-to-do sons of the village. Following his death, Theresa Newman and her three youngest daughters, including Newman, left Lithuania and immigrated to the United States to join two of the older Newman children. They arrived at Ellis Island in May 1901 and went to live with members of the family on the Lower East Side of New York City.

Newman received her earliest education as a member of her father's Talmud class. In New York she was unable to attend public school because of the family's poverty, but she educated herself through extensive reading on her own and as a member of the Socialist Literary Society.

At the turn of the century the great majority of people on the Lower East Side were Russian Jewish immigrants living in crowded, poorly built tenements. Most of them worked in the garment trade for very low wages, with long hours, and in unpleasant and unhealthful surroundings. Many of the Jewish garment workers were veterans of the labor movement and Socialist parties in Russia and, by the time Newman arrived in New York, they were taking the first steps toward organizing the workers and demanding better treatment and wages from the factory owners.

Newman worked in a brush and then a cigarette factory before finding employment at the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory in September 1901. Exposed to the wretched conditions of the garment industry, she sought ways to improve the workers' situation and in time became involved with the Socialist Party and with two new labor groups: the ILGWU and the NYWTUL. In November 1909 Newman left the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory. That month the first great garment strike in New York City, the "Uprising of the Twenty Thousand," took place. The ILGWU sent Newman upstate during the strike to address labor and women's groups and raise funds to help support the workers, who lacked the benefits of a strike fund.

Newman became the first woman organizer for the ILGWU and spent the years 1911-1918 traveling and organizing for the Union, particularly in the Midwest. In Cleveland in 1911 she helped to organize the Cloakmakers' strike and was jailed briefly. In 1912 in Kalamazoo she helped direct the Corsetmakers' strike, which resulted in the shutdown of factories unwilling to cooperate with the Union. Although most of her work during this period was for the ILGWU, she was also occasionally on loan to the Socialist Party. In 1914 she was appointed a factory inspector for the Joint Board of Sanitary Control and helped to establish a sanitary code for the women's garment factories in New York.

Newman became active in the NYWTUL in 1905; there she met other major figures in the labor movement, including Rose Schneiderman, Mary Dreier and Leonora O'Reilly. In 1918 the ILGWU loaned Newman to the Philadelphia WTUL, which she served as president and organizer until 1923; here she met Frieda Miller, who was then secretary of the Philadelphia WTUL and who became her lifelong friend. Newman remained actively involved with the WTUL until it was dissolved in 1950, serving as vice-president of the New York League and as a member of the Executive Board of the National WTUL.

In 1924 Newman returned to New York City and joined the staff of the ILGWU Union Health Center (UHC) as Education Director. During the following decades she represented both the ILGWU and the WTUL on numerous committees and at state, national and international meetings. For many years she served on five Minimum Wage Boards for New York State. She was a member of the Advisory Committees of the Research Division of the New York State Department of Labor and of the New York State Equal Pay Law. On the national level, Newman was a member of the Trade Union Advisory Committee of the U.S. Women's Bureau and of the Children's Bureau, a member of the Women's Committee on Defense Manpower, delegate to the Mid-Century White House Conference on Children and Youth (1950), consultant to the U.S. Public Health Service in the field of industrial hygiene, and a visiting expert for the U.S. Army in Germany, where she investigated the conditions of working women (1949). In 1919 Newman represented the WTUL at the Canadian Labor Congress and in 1923 at the International Congress of Working Women in Vienna. In 1951 she was a delegate to the International Labor Organization Conference on the Problems of Domestic Workers, and in 1962 a delegate to the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions and the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women.

Newman joined the Socialist Party as a young woman and by 1908 began speaking publicly on behalf of the Party and its platforms. She was twice a Socialist candidate: in 1908 for Secretary of State, and in 1918 to represent her district in Congress. Later she supported Franklin Roosevelt and the reforms of the New Deal.

Throughout her life Newman was an outspoken and articulate defender of the rights of working people in general, and of working women in particular. Her support of protective legislation, equal pay, improved working conditions and the minimum wage, and her opposition to the Equal Rights Amendment in the 1930s are well-documented in her numerous articles, some published in ILGWU and WTUL publications, others in more widely circulated newspapers: the New York Call, New Leader, Labor Review, and Labor Woman. Newman also wrote a regular column in Justice, an ILGWU publication (115v, 116v), mostly on issues related to the UHC.

After 1924 Newman lived in New York City and often shared a home with Frieda Miller until the latter's death in 1973. Newman helped to raise Miller's adopted daughter, Elisabeth, and developed close ties to the latter's first husband, David Owen, who was Assistant Secretary General of the United Nations, and their sons Hugh and Michael. In 1981 Newman died on April 8, 1986 in New York City.

SUMMARY OF INVENTORY

  1. Series I. PERSONAL PAPERS, 1919-1977. #1-53
  2. Series II. NATIONAL AND NEW YORK WOMEN'S TRADE UNION LEAGUE, 1903-1964. #54-92
  3. Series III. INTERNATIONAL LADIES' GARMENT WORKERS' UNION, 1912-1980. #93-118
  4. Series IV. OTHER PROFESSIONAL PAPERS, 1900-1980. #119-183
  5. Series V. PHOTOGRAPHS. #184-188

Immediate Source of Acquisition

Accession numbers: 77-M169, 78-M34, 78-M106, 78-M153, 78-M232, 79-M61, 79-M162, 79-M292, 80-M141, 80-M153, 80-M179, 80-M218, 80-M221

The papers of Pauline Newman were given to the Schlesinger Library by Pauline Newman between 1977 and 1980.

Related Material:

There is related material at the Schlesinger Library; see Additional papers of Pauline Newman, 1926-1982 (83-M191--83-M198); Papers of Frieda S. Miller, 1909-1973 (A-37); Additional papers of Frieda S. Miller, 1948-1963 (MC 881); and Papers of Elisabeth Burger, 1880-2013 (inclusive), 1940-2000 (bulk) (MC 868).

CONTAINER LIST

  1. Box 1: Folders 1-20v
  2. Box 2: Folders 21v-39
  3. Box 3: Folders 40-50
  4. Box 4: Folders 51-68
  5. Box 5: Folders 69-86
  6. Box 6: Folders 87-109
  7. Box 7: Folders 110-118
  8. Box 8: Folders 119-145
  9. Box 9: Folders 146-165
  10. Box 10: Folders 166-183, M-44
SELECTED CORRESPONDENTS INDEX
  1. Allen, Christine H. - 167, 168
  2. Allen, Donna - 173
  3. Allen, Mildred E. - 104
  4. Allgood, Carrie Lou - 131
  5. Anderson, Eleanor C. - 146
  6. Anderson, G. Lester - 122
  7. Anderson, Mary - 119, 123
  8. Andrews, John B. - 87, 165
  9. Andrews, Elmer F. - 128
  10. Antonini, Luigi - 104
  11. April, Lauretta H. - 105
  12. Backer, George - 168
  13. Baker, Herbert W. - 126
  14. Barry, Eileen A. - 104
  15. Barton, Dante - 122
  16. Bean, Alice S. - 87
  17. Beckley, Zoe - 165
  18. Beebe, Ira Dow - 104
  19. Beichman, Arnold - 139
  20. Berman, Albert H. - 126
  21. Blaisdell, Doris A. - 169
  22. Blanchard, Helen - 87
  23. Blankertz, Laura E. - 171
  24. Bloodworth, Bess - 141
  25. Blumberg, Hyman - 103
  26. Bobbitt, Joseph M. - 104
  27. Bodansky, Oscar - 87
  28. Bohn, William E. - 102
  29. Bolton, Frances - 164
  30. Bondfield, Margaret - 87, 142
  31. Borah, William Edgar - 122, 136, 164
  32. Borden, Elizabeth B. - 157, 169
  33. Borg, Edith - 165
  34. Broughton, Ada - 166
  35. Brownell, Herbert - 131
  36. Brown, Abraham A. - 105
  37. Buchanan, Lucille F. - 143
  38. Burger, Elisabeth Miller Owen - 51
  39. Burke, John P. - 104, 169
  40. Burton, John E. - 87
  41. Byer, Samuel - 105
  42. Cabrera, Alice M. - 144
  43. Cameron, Beatrice - 87
  44. Cannon, Mary M. - 104, 119
  45. Carey, James B. - 169
  46. Cato, Victoria Nana - 171
  47. Catt, Carrie Chapman - 87
  48. Celler, Emanuel - 164
  49. Chaikin, Sol C. - 106
  50. Charters, Jennie M. - 105
  51. Christman, Elisabeth - 81-84, 145
  52. Claessens, August - 104
  53. Clausen, John A. - 122
  54. Coffin, Joe - 87
  55. Cohen, Rose - 65
  56. Coit, Eleanor Gwinnell - 146
  57. Conkin, Evelyn - 106
  58. Cook, Cara - 87, 169, 171
  59. Cook, Nancy - 173
  60. Corcoran, Loretta C. - 104
  61. Craine, Reva - 170
  62. Corsi, Edward - 128, 131
  63. Craig, Bette - 171
  64. Crone, Harry B. - 171
  65. Cruikshank, Nelson H. - 104, 126
  66. Cullen, Donald E. - 104
  67. Cuming, Nan T. - 87
  68. Cutts, Norma E. - 104
  69. Daniels, Wilbur - 105, 169
  70. Danish, Max D. - 103, 169
  71. Das, Ramananda - 169
  72. Davis, Caroline - 87, 104, 105
  73. Davis, Max D. - 165
  74. Davis, Michael - 105
  75. Deardorff, Neva R. - 167
  76. Dehareng, Marcelle - 139
  77. Dock, Lawrence - 109
  78. Donnelly, Betty Hawley - 103
  79. Douglas, Helen Gahagan - 164
  80. Douglas, Paul H. - 164
  81. Doyle, Frances Burke - 171, 173
  82. Dreier, Mary Elisabeth - 85
  83. Dreier, Theodore - 170
  84. Dubinsky, David - 108
  85. Dudley, Ruth - 105
  86. Eberle, Ray A. - 171
  87. Eckert, Leone W. - 170
  88. Edwards, India - 168
  89. Edwards, Juanita B. - 136
  90. Ekendahl, Sigrid - 170
  91. Ewing, Oscar R. - 103, 122, 124
  92. Fairchild, Mildred - 137
  93. Farrell, Arthur A. - 131
  94. Feldman, Janet - 173
  95. Feldman, Justin - 173
  96. Ferebee, Dorothy - 169
  97. Field, George - 167
  98. Fiske, Herve K. - 165
  99. Fogarty, John E. - 164
  100. Foley, James A. - 131
  101. Forbes, Geraldine - 171
  102. Frank, Walter - 131
  103. Franks, Barbara - 104, 169
  104. Fremont-Smith, Frank - 104, 127
  105. Freedman, Blanch - 87
  106. Friedberg, Gerald - 170
  107. Friedman, Newton S. - 126
  108. Gaddis, Hamilton - 131
  109. Galdston, Iago - 104
  110. Gawthorpe, Mary - 165
  111. Gilmore, Marguerite I. - 167
  112. Gilson, Mary - 167
  113. Glasser, Melvin A. - 123
  114. Gleason, Thomas W. - 106
  115. Gluck, Elsie - 87
  116. Godwin, Anne - 105, 170
  117. Goldberg, Joyce - 106, 171
  118. Golden, Clinton S. - 102
  119. Golden, Harry - 147
  120. Goldmark, Josephine - 87, 173
  121. Goldstein, Israel - 169
  122. Graham, Beatrice - 101
  123. Granger, Lester B. - 128
  124. Gray, Gordon - 122
  125. Green, William - 103, 124
  126. Greenburg, Leonard - 169
  127. Groat, William B., Jr. - 131
  128. Grugett, Sylvia F. - 106
  129. Guernsey, George T. - 104
  130. Gurske, Paul E. - 122
  131. Guthertz, Harriet - 171
  132. Guttman, Nahum - 105
  133. Haag, Anna - 126
  134. Haggard, Godfrey - 168
  135. Hammond, Susan - 104
  136. Hancock, Florence - 169, 170
  137. Hansl, Eva vom Baur - 168
  138. Hardin, Clara A. - 104
  139. Harriman, William Averell - 131
  140. Harris, Jeannette H. - 87
  141. Haskel, Hannah - 104
  142. Hassett, William D. - 122
  143. Held, Adolph - 103, 153
  144. Heller, Rita Rubenstein - 171
  145. Henle, Peter - 104, 124
  146. Herrick, Elinor Morehouse - 148
  147. Herzog, Paul M. - 122
  148. Hill, Thomas F. - 87
  149. Hillman, Bessie - 168
  150. Hillquit, Morris - 149
  151. Hochstein, Irma - 87
  152. Hodges, Arthur W. - 126
  153. Hottel, Althea Kratz - 137, 169
  154. Humphrey, Hubert H. - 164
  155. Hunter, Lois Black - 103, 128, 131
  156. Hutchinson, Millie J. - 165
  157. Ingersoll, Raymond - 128
  158. Isaacson, William J. - 105
  159. Ives, Irving McNeill - 150
  160. Jackson, Myles - 170
  161. Jacobs, Sophia Yarnall - 138
  162. Jarvis, Rebecca - 171
  163. Jensen, Nina - 171
  164. Johnson, Frank E. - 122
  165. Johnson, Michael - 105
  166. Naiser, Clara A. - 104
  167. Kaiser, Philip M. - 131, 137
  168. Kaplan, Benjamin - 104
  169. Katzman, Jacob - 170
  170. Kelly, Edna F. - 164
  171. Kemsley, William - 139
  172. Kenefick, Paul M. - 122
  173. Kenyon, Mildred Adams - 171
  174. Kethly, Anna - 169
  175. Keyserling, Mary Dublin - 119
  176. Kirchwey, Freda - 168
  177. Koetting, Felix A. - 104
  178. Koppelon, Ruth - 87
  179. Kramer, Edward - 106
  180. Kramer, Victor - 128
  181. Krasnow, Ann E. - 166
  182. LaGuardia, Fiorello H. - 167, 168
  183. Laidler, Harry W. - 168
  184. Larrabee, Anne - 119, 120
  185. Lash, Joseph P. - 170
  186. Lazarus, Margaret - 171
  187. Leber, Annedore - 126, 170
  188. Lehman, Herbert H. - 151
  189. Lenroot, Katharine F. - 122, 124
  190. Lerner, Elinor - 171
  191. Lester, Natalie - 168, 169
  192. Lewis, Anthony - 153
  193. Lewis, Leva Morrow - 165, 173
  194. Leyden, Charlotte - 169
  195. Lieberman, Elias - 101
  196. Livermore, Charles - 131
  197. Long, Cedric - 166
  198. Lovestone, Jay - 103
  199. Lowenstein, Solomon - 166, 167
  200. Lowther, Doolie - 103
  201. Lubin, Isador - 87, 128
  202. Luke, Robert A. - 124
  203. Lynch, Jessie D. - 166
  204. McAllister, Dorothy F. - 122, 168
  205. McConnell, Beatrice - 122
  206. MacDonald, Marie B. - 167
  207. Maddalena, Lucille - 171
  208. Magee, Elizabeth S. - 168
  209. Manson, Julius J. - 87
  210. Marantz, Anne - 170
  211. Marconnier, Emily Sims - 131
  212. Margolin, Olya - 171
  213. Mason, Lucy R. - 129
  214. Mauer, James - 152
  215. Maxson, Rhea F. - 126, 168, 169
  216. Maymi, Carmen R. - 122
  217. Mayo, Leonard W. - 124
  218. Mazumdar, Shudha - 170, 171
  219. Meany, George - 102, 124, 169
  220. Mendelsund, Henoch - 105, 106
  221. Menke, William - 126
  222. Meskimen, John K. - 122, 126
  223. Meyer, Max - 126, 128, 167
  224. Miller, Fannie F. - 168
  225. Miller, Frieda Segelke - 38-48, 119, 128, 131
  226. Miller, Marion M. - 103
  227. Miller, Seward E. - 122
  228. Miller, Spencer, Jr. - 167
  229. Minkoff, Nathaniel M. - 105, 170
  230. Mintzer, George J. - 168
  231. Mitchell, James P. - 122
  232. Moore, Lyman - 122
  233. Morgan, Leila - 104
  234. Morgenthau, Robert M. - 105
  235. Moriarity, Mary S. - 169
  236. Morrison, Joan - 172
  237. Murphy, Mike - 171
  238. Nagler, Isadore - 102
  239. Nameroff, Goldie - 105
  240. Nason, Rachel Conrad - 119
  241. Neidle, Cecyle S. - 171
  242. Nelson, Louis - 104
  243. Nestor, Agnes - 87
  244. Nestor, Mary - 87
  245. Neufeld, Maurice F. - 103
  246. Newell, Sarah - 153
  247. Newton, Elizabeth - 139
  248. Niemeyer, John H. - 87
  249. Norton, Mary T. - 122, 164
  250. O'Brien, Richard C. - 126
  251. O'Reilly, Leonora - 80
  252. O'Sullivan, Judith - 106
  253. Owen, David - 51
  254. Owen, Hugh - 53
  255. Owen, Michael - 53
  256. Owen, Trevor - 51
  257. Papert, Kate - 128, 131
  258. Paret, Bertha R. - 87
  259. Parsons, Rose P. - 138
  260. Payne, Louise - 105
  261. Pearce, Charles A. - 131
  262. Peck, Abraham J. - 171
  263. Perkins, Frances - 154
  264. Pesotta, Rose - 169
  265. Peterson, Esther - 154
  266. Peterson, Oliver A. - 104
  267. Peterson, Vera - 156
  268. Peyton, Jasper - 106
  269. Pheifer, Ruth - 170
  270. Phillips, Marion - 166, 173
  271. Pickford, Ivor - 170
  272. Pidgeon, Mary Elizabeth - 119
  273. Pilot, Wanda - 104
  274. Pincus, Harrier - 169, 173
  275. Plunkett, Margaret L. - 119
  276. Polier, Justine Wise - 167
  277. Price, George M. - 107
  278. Price, Leo - 107
  279. Pryor, David - 164
  280. Quinn, James C. - 103
  281. Rabinoff, Sophie - 104
  282. Rankin, Jeannette - 164
  283. Redmond, James C. - 167
  284. Reese, VictorBB. - 87
  285. Reticher, Ruth - 169
  286. Richman, Florence R. - 171
  287. Rifkin, Bernard - 104
  288. Rippey, Sarah Cory - 87
  289. Rittenhouse, Irma - 131
  290. Roberson, Esther - 107
  291. Robins, Margaret Dreier - 87
  292. Robins, Raymond - 165
  293. Rogers, Hugo E. - 168
  294. Rooney, John J. - 158
  295. Roosevelt, Eleanor - 86, 159
  296. Rose, Gertrude - 106
  297. Rosenberg, Anna M. - 122
  298. Ross, William - 105
  299. Santander-Downing, Pilar - 170
  300. Schachner, Eleanor - 170
  301. Schermerhorn, Gertrude L. - 103
  302. Schlesinger, Arthur, Jr. - 170
  303. Schneiderman, Rose - 77, 78, 79
  304. Scott, K. Frances - 87
  305. Shane, Joe - 104
  306. Shaplen, Joseph - 165
  307. Shepard, Richard F. - 153
  308. Sherick, Mary - 173
  309. Shientag, Florence Perlow - 169
  310. Silk, Gertrude N. - 87
  311. Simmons, Helen A. - 167
  312. Sims, Van Buren - 168
  313. Slavit, Joseph - 103
  314. Smith, Ethel M. - 87
  315. Smith, Margaret Chase - 164
  316. Solomon, Barbara - 157
  317. Somers, Anne Ramsay - 172
  318. Spargo, John - 168
  319. Spirack, Edith I. - 172
  320. Starr, Josephine S. - 171
  321. Starr, Mark - 104
  322. Stein, Leon - 171
  323. Stephen, Jessie - 170
  324. Stolarsky, Israel - 170
  325. Stone, Lester B. - 168
  326. Stone, Mark K. - 171
  327. Stone, Margaret F. - 87
  328. Straus, Dorothy - 136
  329. Stulberg, Louis - 104, 106
  330. Sutherland, Mary E. - 169, 170
  331. Swartz, Maud - 87
  332. Swartz, Nelle - 131
  333. Switzer, Mary Elizabeth - 87
  334. Tannler, Sally Marshall - 160, 161
  335. Taylor, Mary - 124
  336. Tax, Meredith - 171
  337. Thaler, Seymour R. - 131
  338. Thompson, Dorothy - 165
  339. Tiffin, Peter - 171
  340. Tobin, Maurice J. - 122
  341. Todd, Jane H. - 131
  342. Tone, Gertrude Franchot - 162
  343. Truman, Harry S. - 124
  344. Tryon, Ruth W. - 168
  345. Turkel, Fannie - 146
  346. Tyler, Gus - 105, 106
  347. Ulman, Ruth - 172
  348. Umhey, Frederick F. - 102, 103, 104, 107
  349. Van Deerlin, Lionel - 164
  350. Van Kleeck, Mary - 87, 165, 168
  351. Waggoner, Raymond W. - 104
  352. Wagner, Robert F. - 164
  353. Watanabe, Hanako - 137
  354. Wemple, Harry D. - 126, 128, 131
  355. Wertheimer, Barbara - 163
  356. Werts, Leo R. - 122
  357. Whalen, Anna M. - 87
  358. Whipple, Katherine Z.W. - 104
  359. Whitelock, Frances E. - 119
  360. Willen, Joseph - 166
  361. Willen, Pearl - 138
  362. Williams, Albert R. - 101
  363. Willson, Hawley - 138
  364. Winslow, Mary N. - 87
  365. Winter, Max - 166
  366. Wolfe, Elsie - 119
  367. Woodsmall, Ruth F. - 126, 129
  368. Wright, Ralph - 122
  369. Young, Jacqueline - 171
  370. Zempel, Arnold - 104

Processing Information

Processed: July 1981

By: Donna Webber
Link to catalog
Title
Newman, Pauline. Papers of Pauline Newman, 1900-1980: A Finding Aid
Author
Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America
Sponsor
This collection was processed under a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (RC-0051-79-1260).
EAD ID
sch00018

Repository Details

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