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COLLECTION Identifier: H MS c16

Benjamin Waterhouse papers

Waterhouse, Benjamin, 1754-1846, A.L.s. to [ ]; Cambridge, 1 side (2 pages), circa 1813-1815, 1813-1815 Digital

Scope and Contents Unaddressed correspondence, most likely to United States Surgeon General James Tilton, regarding the provision of liquor to soldiers in the Army and the ill effects of alcohol consumption.

Waterhouse, Benjamin, 1754-1846, A.L.s. to [ ]; Cambridge, 1 side (2 pages), 1828 August 7, 1828 August 7 Digital

Scope and Contents Unaddressed correspondence to the commanding officer of his son Andrew, possibly Colonel Long, that was enclosed with 10 dollars, which Waterhouse sent for Andrew after he was robbed.

Waterhouse, Benjamin, 1754-1846, A.L.s. to [ ]; Cambridge, 1 side (1 page), 1829 April 13, 1829 April 13 Digital

Scope and Contents Correspondence to unknown recipient, possibly Colonel Long, the commanding officer of son Andrew's army regiment, requesting advice on whether Andrew should reenlist. Waterhouse further inquires about a promotion for his son.

Waterhouse, Benjamin, 1754-1846, A.L.s. to John Adams; Cambridge, 1 side (4 pages), 1806 March 30, 1806 March 30 Digital

Scope and Contents Correspondence in which Waterhouse laments Harvard Corporation's choice of Fisher Ames as university president, describing him as "a man no one ever thought of; a sort of negative character; a man without friends or enemies; a man as ignorant of the world as if he had never been born into it; a mere mathematician, to which brand of science he is a bigot; a man who thinks that all the rest of the world are busy about trifles, mathematicians excepted!" Ames declined the presidency due to his...

Waterhouse, Benjamin, 1754-1846, A.L.s. to John Adams; Cambridge, 1 side (4 pages), 1816 February 2, 1816 February 2 Digital

Scope and Contents Correspondence discussing the Army's attempts to relocate Waterhouse from his post in Boston to an unwanted posting at the hospital department in Jackets Harbor, New York, which he attributes to the work of his "professional & political enemies.".

Waterhouse, Benjamin, 1754-1846, A.L.s. to John Quincy Adams; Cambridge, 1 side (2 pages), 1825, 1825 Digital

Scope and Contents Correspondence discussing Canadian politics and the decision by Harvard Corporation to combine the botanical and natural history professorships. Waterhouse also comments on the decline of student enrollment at Harvard.

Waterhouse, Benjamin, 1754-1846, 2 A.L. (copies?) to Wooster Beach; Cambridge, 1836 July 20-1836 July 23, 1836 July 20-1836 July 23 Digital

Scope and Contents Correspondence to Beach, founder of the eclectic medical movement, in which Waterhouse addresses some of the ideas contained in Beach's three-volume The American Practice of Medicine. Waterhouse also discusses Samuel Thomson's education and his career in alternative medicine.

Waterhouse, Benjamin, 1754-1846, A.L.s. to Nathaniel Bowditch; Cambridge, 1 side (3 pages), 1833 October 19, 1833 October 19 Digital

Scope and Contents Correspondence written to mathematician Bowditch, in which Waterhouse says he plans to send him an interleaved copy of his Essay on Junius and his letters, and asks that Bowditch add his comments on the blank pages. "I seek correction rather than eulogy, accuracy rather than practical flourish," Waterhouse explains. He also mentions he will seek the opinion of the New Hampshire judge John Pickering (1737-1805).

Waterhouse, Benjamin, 1754-1846, A.L.s. to Henry Alexander Scammell Dearborn; Cambridge, 1 side (2 pages), 1833 July 17, 1833 July 17 Digital

Scope and Contents In correspondence to lawyer and politician Dearborn, Waterhouse comments on three volumes of a manuscript he had sent Waterhouse, possibly his Manuscript on the Life of General Dearborn. The seven-volume book, published in 1822-1824, addressed the contemporary controversy over differing accounts of his father, General Henry Dearborn (1751-1829), and General Israel Putnam (1718-1790) regarding the Battle of Bunker Hill. Waterhouse also discusses the activities of the local Anti-Masonic Party.