Skip to main content Skip to search Skip to search results
COLLECTION Identifier: H MS c17

Waterhouse family papers

Miscellaneous, 1845, undated, 1845, Digital

Scope and Contents

Consists of signatures of Ware family members and some correspondence.

Waterhouse, Benjamin, 1754-1846, A.L.s. to Elizabeth Watson, (Waterhouse) [Ware]; Cambridge, 1 side (4 pages), 1816 November 11, 1816 November 11 Digital

Scope and Contents

Correspondence to his daughter about a visit she was planning with her sister, Mary, to their grandmother, and the inheritance they may hope to receive from her, as well as his plans to remarry to Louisa Lee.

Waterhouse, Benjamin, 1754-1846, 4 A.L.s. to William Ware; Cambridge, 1823 August 23-probably 1831, 1823 August 23, 1831 Digital

Scope and Contents

Contains correspondence to his son-in-law regarding news and activities of family and mutual friends, including comments on John Quincy Adams, a wedding Waterhouse attended, and a fever that had afflicted Henry Ware. Also contains a typed transcription of one letter.

Waterhouse, Benjamin, 1754-1846, 3 A.L.s. to Elizabeth [(Oliver)] Waterhouse, 1808 August 26-1811 August 15, 1808 August 26-1811 August 15 Digital

Scope and Contents

Correspondence to his daughter relaying details of his travels New Haven, Connecticut, where he met with United States Treasury Secretary Albert Gallatin, and his visit to Noah Webster's home, as well as a trip to Philadelphia, where he visited with Benjamin Rush. Waterhouse also writes about his other children and his own social activities, which included a dinner with Harvard President John Thornton Kirkland.

Ware, Mary (Waterhouse), 1799-1872, A.L.s. to Benjamin Waterhouse; Long Island [New York], 1 side (4 pages), undated Digital

Scope and Contents

Correspondence written to her father while she was staying on Long Island, describing her lodgings and the weather, and inquiring about political news from Massachusetts.

Waterhouse, Andrew Oliver, 1789-1832, 8 A.L.s. to Henry Ware; [verso page] Folder 1, 1818 October 2-1819 July 25, 1818 October 2-1819 July 25 Digital

Scope and Contents

Correspondence regarding his travels to states including Maryland and Pennsylvania in which he describes the people he visited and work he was undertaking. Waterhouse also comments on his troubles with asthma.

Waterhouse, Andrew Oliver, 1789-1832, 8 A.L.s. to Henry Ware; [verso page] Folder 2, 1819 September 30-1822 July 9, 1819 September 30-1822 July 9 Digital

Scope and Contents

Correspondence written from Missouri while he was traveling there on an expedition with the army, in which he reports on his daily activities, the local wildlife and landscape, and his regiment's skirmish with "an unruly set of Indians."

Waterhouse, Benjamin, 1797-1843, 13 A.L.s. to Elizabeth [Watson] (Waterhouse) Ware, Folder 1, 1813 June 18-1819 January 19, 1813 June 18-1819 January 19 Digital

Scope and Contents

Correspondence to his sister from Phillips Academy, Andover, where Waterhouse was a student, regarding troubles he was having with a teacher, as well as correspondence written while he was living in South Carolina and Georgia, concerning his work as a teacher, his finances, and social activities. Some correspondence is addressed to both sisters.

Waterhouse, Benjamin, 1797-1843, 13 A.L.s. to Elizabeth [Watson] (Waterhouse) Ware, Folder 2, 1819 February 18-1821 September 10, 1819 February 18-1821 September 10 Digital

Scope and Contents

Correspondence to his sisters describing his travels to Amelia Island, Florida, and Cumberland Island, Georgia, including comments on the people he encountered and local vegetation. He provides observations from Savannah, Georgia, following a fire in that city.

Waterhouse, John Fothergill, 1791-1817, 18 A.L. to Elizabeth Watson (Waterhouse) Ware and Mary (Waterhouse) Ware; Philadelphia, Folder 3, 1815 February 17-December 16, and undated, 1815 February 17-December 16 Digital

Scope and Contents

Correspondence to his sisters discussing his work, social life, and other events in Philadelphia, such as ceremonies for the launch of the United States naval ship Franklin, several deaths with the launch, and an ensuing riot. He also writes expressing grief over the death of their mother, and offers observations on cultural differences between Boston and Philadelphia.